EDWORDS: Latest Blog Posts

  • I Think I Can! I Think I Can! Nurturing Children's Self-Esteem

    Probably one of the best predictors of a child’s success in life is strong self-confidence and self-esteem. They will set high goals for themselves and believe they can achieve anything they set their minds to. This is an outcome we all want for our children, but for some, it may not come so easy. High self-esteem is acquired and is not genetic. It is built a little at a time through their relationships with adults and other children. Life environments vary and support for self-worth and confide ...

    by Debra Pierce | @easycda
    Friday, 21 September 2018
  • Family Glamping, A Lesson in Love

    I had an extraordinary day yesterday. Did you? And I can hardly wait to tell you what happened. You be the judge.  Here in America, the Labor Day holiday weekend is an end of summer opportunity to reflect and make observations about past and future. Lessons always surround us when we watch, listen and learn. That proved to be so true for me yesterday. Here's how it happened. We go through phases and stages in life where it seems like stuff is just rolling downhill faster than we can keep ...

    by Rita Wirtz | @RitaWirtz
    Monday, 03 September 2018
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    Ninety-five Percent

    On the first day of school, Ronaldo entered my fifth grade classroom, a few hundred decibels louder than his peers.  I asked him to quiet down and find the seat I had already picked out for him.  He looked at me, smirked, and sat down.  The boy was a restless child who had yet learned where his on/off switch was.  He needed to be reminded often to not shout out, to not get up and walk around the room, to not pester the girl sitting next to him.   He also needed t ...

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    by Tim Ramsey | @PlutoTim
    Monday, 03 September 2018
  • There's Still Time To Make a Change!

    Whether you're heading back to school, coming off a holiday break, or maybe you're smack dab in the middle of a school year, I know it's easy to feel "locked in" and unable to make any changes. This is fairly common. As the stress of the year increases, it feels like it gets harder and harder to make changes to your instruction, classroom management, or just about anything else! The truth is...it IS possible, and YOU CAN DO IT! There is still time! There are a few things you should remember tho ...

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    by Chad Ostrowski | @chadostrowski
    Friday, 31 August 2018
  • Tired

    The next person who comes to me with the latest, newest, cure-all packaged program designed to meet the needs of all kids - fully equipped with glitzy strategies, charts, worksheets and data charts that must be utilized in a prescribed, lock-step fashion with “fidelity” - better be prepared to stand before my kids for an entire day – alone! On top of that, they’d better prepare themselves for the five hours after school that they will need to subtract from their family’s life to grade papers, ca ...

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    by Tim Ramsey | @PlutoTim
    Sunday, 26 August 2018
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Avoiding Bumps Along the Way by Debra Pierce

The Verification Visit with the PD Specialist has a specific structure. You must bring your Professional Portfolio and the Competency Standards book to the Verification Visit. The pages in the back of the book will be used during for the Observation, the Review of the documentation, and the Reflective Dialogue.

The PD Specialist will look over your documentation, verifying the CDA training and the contents of the Profession Portfolio. The PD Specialist will be using p. 20 of the Comprehensive Scoring Instrument (at the back of the Competency Standards book) to record evidence from the Professional Portfolio. This would include verifying your CDA training, the number of Family Questionnaires collected, the Resource Collection, the six Competency Statements, and the professional Philosophy Statement.

There are two parts of your documentation that are extremely important and if they are incomplete, inaccurate, or missing, your CDA will be put on hold until it is corrected.

These two include:

1. The CDA training hours. If there are not enough hours accounted for (and the candidate has not    received a waiver) or the training is not from an   accepted source (See the section in the Competency Standards book that describes “Acceptable Professional Education”).

2. The first aid/CPR certification. This certification must be the type the Council requires (infant/child “pediatric” CPR) and it must not be expired.

The PD Specialist will wait until the end of your Verification Visit to tell you if either of these two problems exist and explain that the Council will be sending a postcard with the required procedures in order to continue your CDA process. This must be completed within 6 months of the date you received the “Ready to Schedule” notice. If not, your CDA will be forfeited.

Are There Any Other Issues That Can Put the Brakes On My CDA?

Yes, there are. One of them can happen early on in the process. If you are working in a child care program, you will need to decide on a CDA setting endorsement. This would be either infant/toddler or preschool. You will indicate this choice when ordering your Competency Standards book from the Council for Professional Recognition.

That book will be tailored to earning a CDA for that specific endorsement, including your Resource Collection, your Competency Statements, your Professional Philosophy Statement, the Observation, and Verification Visit.

Be sure to let the center-director know you have made this choice. It is critical that your classroom placement and the endorsement you choose match and stay the same until after your Observation and Verification Visit.

If your classroom is changed, you may not have the same age group as before, which would mean the materials ordered from the Council would not be valid for this new classroom. You would need to purchase another Competency Standards book for your current setting and classroom.

If you are a “floater” in your child care program, you will need to be proactive, as well. Moving around from one classroom and age group to another will simply not work when earning a CDA.

Furthermore, you and the children in that room need to get to know each other well and you need to be very familiar with the routines and environment, so you can act as lead teacher on the day of your Observation. The parents of the children must know you well enough to complete the Family Questionnaires.

Tell your director that if she wants you to earn your CDA, she will have to support you with this. If you aren’t getting the cooperation of the management in maintaining a particular setting through your CDA process, you may need to find another place to work that will.

As you work on your CDA, remember there is     support and help. Getting started is often the hardest part… just knowing where to begin. Staying         organized is the key and having some step-by-step help doesn’t hurt, either! Check out the new CDA Prep Workbook and pre-assembled binders on my website.

Your stress will be gone in no time. I promise!

Visit my website at easycda.com