EDWORDS: Latest Blog Posts

  • Sensei!

    Champions in school, champions at life. Respect. Thank you to our Sensei, master teacher for teaching us never-ending, continual improvement. “Kai Zen!” Karate classes, taught by Sensei, extraordinary meshing of kids and Instructor. Listen to the children with me, powering up their spirits with the sound of “Kiai”, sounds like kee-eye. Here we go! Outfits on, belts tied, spirits soaring. Saying no to bullies, but more than that. Ready to enhance balance, build muscle tone, follow direction ...

    by Rita Wirtz | @RitaWirtz
    Sunday, 21 May 2017
  • Foundation of Social-Emotional Learning

    Everyone has an invisible sign hanging from their neck saying, "Make me feel important."  (Mary Kay Ash) In educational circles today, I hear a lot about social and emotional skills, social and emotional learning, and so forth. Foundational for preschoolers to learn how to relate to the people around them and to begin to regulate themselves is a feeling of being valued and valuable. All children in our classes want to feel valued; they want to know (with the heart not the head) someo ...

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    by R Scott Wiley | @sxwiley
    Wednesday, 17 May 2017
  • pill

    Is There a Pill?

    "Mr. President, the pilot has announced he will be landing the plane in Dallas in ten minutes." "You know, I don't have a good feeling about this. Tell the pilot to turn the plane around and head back to Washington. Okay?" Such was a typical exchange between me and Luke, an eighth-grade special needs student. He usually provided the set up leaving me to improvise some witty response. Genuinely entertained and fully understanding my comeback, he did what any junior high student would do: he g ...

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    by Tim Ramsey | @PlutoTim
    Tuesday, 16 May 2017
  • Twitter logo

    Unfollow Me, Please

    It’s been very busy on my end over the past month. I released my second podcast, published my first flash-read on Amazon, and have crisscrossed the country. Despite all of the good stuff, those who aren’t fans of mine capitalized on some mistakes that were made under my watch. As a superintendent, the buck stops with me.  I am responsible for everything that happens under the time I am there. I’m also responsible for giving and getting the best possible education for students. I’m not pe ...

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    by Jay Eitner | @Jay_Eitner
    Monday, 15 May 2017
  • a1sx2_Original1_hell-always-be-there-2.jpg

    He'll Always Be There

        This is one of those things that I learned through failure. Several years ago, I went through a very dark period in my life. A period during which I was under a lot of stress. Some of it was self-induced and some of it was caused by outside forces. I lost twenty pounds. I began taking medication for anxiety. I fought like Hell to put on a happy face when I was out in public. But by the time I got home I was tired. And I am quite certain that my wife and kids saw a side of me ...

    by Jon Harper / @Jonharper70bd
    Sunday, 14 May 2017
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Avoiding Bumps Along the Way by Debra Pierce

The Verification Visit with the PD Specialist has a specific structure. You must bring your Professional Portfolio and the Competency Standards book to the Verification Visit. The pages in the back of the book will be used during for the Observation, the Review of the documentation, and the Reflective Dialogue.

The PD Specialist will look over your documentation, verifying the CDA training and the contents of the Profession Portfolio. The PD Specialist will be using p. 20 of the Comprehensive Scoring Instrument (at the back of the Competency Standards book) to record evidence from the Professional Portfolio. This would include verifying your CDA training, the number of Family Questionnaires collected, the Resource Collection, the six Competency Statements, and the professional Philosophy Statement.

There are two parts of your documentation that are extremely important and if they are incomplete, inaccurate, or missing, your CDA will be put on hold until it is corrected.

These two include:

1. The CDA training hours. If there are not enough hours accounted for (and the candidate has not    received a waiver) or the training is not from an   accepted source (See the section in the Competency Standards book that describes “Acceptable Professional Education”).

2. The first aid/CPR certification. This certification must be the type the Council requires (infant/child “pediatric” CPR) and it must not be expired.

The PD Specialist will wait until the end of your Verification Visit to tell you if either of these two problems exist and explain that the Council will be sending a postcard with the required procedures in order to continue your CDA process. This must be completed within 6 months of the date you received the “Ready to Schedule” notice. If not, your CDA will be forfeited.

Are There Any Other Issues That Can Put the Brakes On My CDA?

Yes, there are. One of them can happen early on in the process. If you are working in a child care program, you will need to decide on a CDA setting endorsement. This would be either infant/toddler or preschool. You will indicate this choice when ordering your Competency Standards book from the Council for Professional Recognition.

That book will be tailored to earning a CDA for that specific endorsement, including your Resource Collection, your Competency Statements, your Professional Philosophy Statement, the Observation, and Verification Visit.

Be sure to let the center-director know you have made this choice. It is critical that your classroom placement and the endorsement you choose match and stay the same until after your Observation and Verification Visit.

If your classroom is changed, you may not have the same age group as before, which would mean the materials ordered from the Council would not be valid for this new classroom. You would need to purchase another Competency Standards book for your current setting and classroom.

If you are a “floater” in your child care program, you will need to be proactive, as well. Moving around from one classroom and age group to another will simply not work when earning a CDA.

Furthermore, you and the children in that room need to get to know each other well and you need to be very familiar with the routines and environment, so you can act as lead teacher on the day of your Observation. The parents of the children must know you well enough to complete the Family Questionnaires.

Tell your director that if she wants you to earn your CDA, she will have to support you with this. If you aren’t getting the cooperation of the management in maintaining a particular setting through your CDA process, you may need to find another place to work that will.

As you work on your CDA, remember there is     support and help. Getting started is often the hardest part… just knowing where to begin. Staying         organized is the key and having some step-by-step help doesn’t hurt, either! Check out the new CDA Prep Workbook and pre-assembled binders on my website.

Your stress will be gone in no time. I promise!

Visit my website at easycda.com