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Eric Jensen

Eric Jensen

Eric Jensen is a former teacher with a real love of learning. He grew up in San Diego and attended public schools. While his academic background is in English and human development, he has a real love of educational neuroscience. For over 20 years, he has been connecting the research with practical classroom applications. Most importantly, he models what he has learned, so teachers can see it, hear it and experience the difference. He is the author of numerous books on brain-based learning, including Teaching with the Brain in Mind and Brain-Based Learning: The New Paradigm of Teaching.

Posted by on in School Culture

Recent Discovery


Music is the perfect stimulus for triggering either raw or complex emotions. First, as you might expect, while novel music can be fun, you'll get the highest emotional response from playing music which is familiar to your students (Pereira et al., 2011). Typically, the familiar songs evoke strong positive memories. This suggests if you want to play novel music to kids, you might need a bit of repetition (playing it over and over and associate it with new positives) to turn it into a consistent positive trigger for students.

 

Another study investigated whether and how individuals employ music to induce specific emotional states. The music was used in everyday situations solely to manage personal emotions. This study shows how emotion-congruent music selections are extra powerful in activating emotional states in everyday situations (Thoma et al., 2011). It validates something very important to me: sometimes the best reason to use music in your own work is that it puts you in a positive emotional state for doing your best work.

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Posted by on in Social Emotional Learning

Is the expression, “Fight, flight or freeze” a myth or science?

 

There’s an assumption that if a student in school feels threatened in any way, there’s going to be an immediate response we’ve all heard of before. Those might include “fight” (talk back to teacher, argue or even get physical), “flight” (try to get out of the situation, change seats, rooms or get out school), or “freeze” (quit participating and disconnect from learning).

 

However, recent research tells us there’s far more going on. In fact, you might be surprised what researchers have discovered about student emotions (and your own)…

 

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