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Gail Multop @gailmult

Gail Multop @gailmult

Gail teaches Early Childhood Education as an Adjunct Associate Professor for Northern Virginia Community College, one of the largest community college systems in the country. She is a popular trainer in the DC area, leading workshops on such topics as Engaging, Arts-Based and Outdoor Learning, and Guiding Behavior. She is a member of the Virginia Community College Peer Group which collaborates with the Virginia Department of Social Services to train and license childcare professionals throughout the state. Her blog on BAM's EdWords is referenced in several arts websites, and is used in Early Childhood courses throughout Virginia. She is also a member of NAREA, the North American Reggio Emilia Alliance. You can contact her for more information about Professional Development opportunities. 


Gail lives and works in Northern Virginia. Her special interests include arts-integration, play, Reggio Emilia, music and yoga. 

Posted by on in Early Childhood

It started when I gave my students a passage from The Hundred Languages of Children to analyze and discuss. It was, I confess, rather abstruse, and they were speechless when I asked for opinions. In frustration, I blurted out: Malaguzzi took it one step further. Vygotsky said that language was interdependent with growth and development. He was talking about verbal language. Malaguzzi asserted that the hundred languages at children’s disposal were interdependent with their development. All of these languages helped them express what they knew and furthermore, changed them and those around them. I was rather emphatic, as I can be, sometimes when talking about children. But I gave them this example:

At a NAREA conference, George Forman showed a video of mobile infants, sitting on the floor, watching teachers spin pot lids like tops. The babies watched, and then expressed their understanding of what they saw: They began undulating their bodies as they sat! The babies were being playful, but their behavior was purposeful. This is how a baby expresses a concept. I believe there was a combination of physical, intellectual and emotional intent inherent in their behavior. Teachers provided the “provocation”, and the babies went for it.  So much cognitive development going on, and in an artistic language—dance!

Similarly, older children at play are exploring concepts through different modes of expression. Stomping around to imitate dinosaurs demonstrates a three’s understanding of force, as well as their understanding of psychological intent (intimidation, power). Painting a picture demonstrates a four’s understanding of light and dark, one’s day, or the universe. Sharing work with each other can bring more learning and development. My boys, last year, began drawing from a picture of a T-Rex. Every day they took time to gather and draw, pointing out different parts of the picture to each other, arguing about perspective, detail and color (Constructive arguing, I like to call it). This was interdependent learning at its finest.

Teachers in a center situation can be a potent resource, asking questions that bring out the intent of play (“Oh, I see you are making a house” doesn’t cut it!).  A teacher must be a grounding presence; an advocate for the individual child’s intent, even when the child doesn’t yet know what that intent is. To continually look for the intent through listening, observing, and collaboration is to be the “intentional teacher” that we all seek to be. This teacher (and other members of the team) provides what is necessary for children to seek the experiences they need, and to express their learning in powerful ways. A teacher moves with the children; s/he collaborates with them.

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Posted by on in Early Childhood

ying yang wallpaper by rstovall

I love listening to to Rae Pica’s BAM Radio program, Studentcentricity, during my commute to Northern Virginia Community college to teach. Thank God for Bluetooth! Last night I listened to a program about enjoying process over product in education. I totally agree with Amanda Morgan. Teachers shouldn’t do toddlers’ art for them, or give cookie-cutter art projects to preschoolers. They should know, by now, that asking for the right answer shuts off the process of learning to think. But they still do these things, with good, if misguided, intentions. Parents love the cute. Children love to be praised by their teachers and parents. Our culture mandates the great finished product. This cultural bias invades our efforts to teach young children how to solve problems, find creative solutions, and pursue worthy projects.

But wait a minute! Solving problems? Finding Solutions? Projects? Isn’t that about product?

Years ago in education, we discussed the importance of divergent, vs. convergent thinking. Divergent thinking was elevated, as well it should have been, because for too long convergent thinking (getting the “right” answer) was seen as the sole indicator of intelligence. Brainstorming, mind-mapping, and webbing became symbols and tools for divergent thinking. Creativity depends on divergent thinking! We need it in order to converge on something cool! Diverging to different creative ideas eventually leads to answers, products, which lead to more thinking, more creating and—yep—more final products.

Today we elevate process over product, just as we did divergent over convergent thinking. In doing so, we perpetuate a false dichotomy. As the old song goes (even though its premise was not true), “…you can’t have one without the other.” Amanda discussed allowing children to make mistakes in order for them to learn. Mistakes are not bad. They are necessary bumps on the road to learning. The cognitive process involved is invaluable to the child. They learn to learn. Process leads to product, which leads to…well, you know! A false dichotomy is where there is either one right answer or another. The two ideas compete. There should be no competition between process and product. Like the colors in the Yin/Yang sympol, there’s a little bit of each in the other.

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Posted by on in Early Childhood

This past fall, our center took on an exciting professional development project. We were privileged to have Katherine Lyons work with us as our artist-in-residence. Katherine is an actor by profession and works for the Wolf Trap Institute for Early Learning through the Arts. She is a teacher trainer using drama to address learning standards. I hardly need to reiterate my own passion for teaching through the arts. I pursued a certificate from CETA (Changing Education Through the Arts). What was unique to me, among other things, was a particular chant she used to teach our three to five year olds what older children usually learn in elementary school English.

I have taken children’s stories in dictation for many years, and have a collection of them that I share with college students. I even conducted a study in graduate school of the differences between dictated stories among boys and girls in each age group from two and a half through five. I have always allowed children to dictate their stories without a particular framework. There are many books, videos and articles about children’s stories that support this approach. This chant, and the Wolf Trap approach, went much further…

“A story…a story…a story…a story! Let it out, and bring it in! Let it out, and bring it in” (gesture with arms forward and then back, like casting and reeling for a fish).

Who-o-o’s in the story? Who-o-o’s in the story?

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Posted by on in Early Childhood

I have been teaching Art, Music and Movement to college students for a while. There are certain concepts we try to get across to practitioners that are important to ECE professionals, and encouraged by our professional organization, NAEYC. One of those concepts is the idea of open-ended activities.

What are open-ended activities?  Do you put out a mass of materials and say, “Go get ‘em”, like one workshop participant opined? If you change materials, are you being too “teacher-ish”?

Well, yes and no…

Because many tend to think, in this post-social media age, that each question has a right and a wrong; that the right is might, and the wrong is way too strong, we have trouble seeing the grey areas. Perhaps I’d rather say the value areas. In art, adding white or black to a color changes its value. When we consider concepts, our values may change a tiny bit or a lot, depending on what is added or subtracted. So, as Diane Kashin has written, there is a continuum between a concept such as “open-ended” and its opposite. Open-ended might mean throw the lot of your materials on a table and see what they do, and closed might mean giving children directions and materials, saying what they must do with them (generally not recommended!). But in between, ah, there is a rainbow of values!

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Posted by on in Early Childhood

children playing music

Music makes everything better. I recently gave a presentation about this topic to caregivers and teachers in Fredericksburg, Virginia. I emphasized the tremendous importance of music experiences for young children, talked about using music and movement for behavior management, and gave examples. The attendees were enthusiastic. Many have used clean-up songs and hand-washing songs for a while. But they weren’t aware of the power of using music to elevate or calm mood, or the power of movement to smooth transitions, something my friend, Rae Pica, speaks of so eloquently on her new YouTube Channel.

I work in a quality child care center. We sing directions all the time. We make up the tunes, or use old favorite tunes with the appropriate words (to the tune of "If you’re Happy and You Know It": “Put your bottom on the rug, on the rug. Put your bottom on the rug…and give yourself a hug. Put your bottom on the rug, on the rug.” Or anything else you can think of!

I talked about what I call “waiting songs”. What are waiting songs? Why do children have to wait? In a perfect world, they shouldn’t have to, but it happens. My example to them was that sometimes the whole group is outfitted for the cold and someone suddenly has to go to the bathroom. Yes, we had them go ahead of time, but nature calls again, sometimes, and we need to accommodate. One of my waiting songs is a Raffi tune called, “Something in my shoe”. You can look on YouTube for it (but learn to sing it! Do not use a video when a live teacher is available!). At the end, the children mime, with the teacher, going to bed. So the song can be used as an activity that morphs into a settling down song before a story as well.

Wee must never waste children’s time. Having them sit still while someone “goes” is wasting their time. Asking them to join you in a waiting song gives them the opportunity to move and sing. They are practicing math skills (rhythm, rhyme, and language patterns). The steady beat of a song nurtures attention skills. Dare I say it prevents squabbling, also? It does.

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