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Lisa Nielsen | @InnovativeEdu

Lisa Nielsen | @InnovativeEdu

Lisa Nielsen is The Innovative Educator. She found school boring and irrelevant. That ticked her off so in 1997 she became a public school educator who works to help change that for others. She does this by finding and sharing innovative ways to prepare students for relevant and real-world success. Among other things, this means ensuring educators and students have a voice in conversations, issues, and policies that affect them.

Lisa writes for and speaks to audiences across the globe about the future of education but she is best known for her award-winning blog, The Innovative Educator. Her writing and work are also featured in places such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, T.H.E. Journal, Tech & Learning, and Smartblogs. She is also the author of several books such as Teaching Generation Text and Fix the School, Not the Child.

Blog: InnovativeEducator.com
Twitter: @InnovativeEdu

Posted by on in General

MILITARY

 

This is just one in a series of ongoing posts on the educational innovations in Israel. You can see additional coverage here. 

In the United States, youth have become what school critics like John Taylor Gatto refer to as infantilized. Their days and activities are structured by what adults tell them to do. They view their work as disconnected from them, having little relevance or meaning in their lives.

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Posted by on in General

ConnectedED

Last month educators had to say goodbye to Joe Bower. Shortly prior, we lost Bob Sprankle. This week, I was stunned to learn we lost another innovative educator,Deven Black. I knew Deven as an intellectual out-of-the-box thinker. I loved speaking with Deven because he appreciated having lively conversations where we might disagree on a topic and knew on the other side of it, we’d both come out smarter.

 

Deven credits me for getting him started with social media. He said he was pissed when my advice on how to get started with Twitter and other social media was, “Just create an account and do it.” He was looking for a more complex answer I suppose. He told me he followed my suggestion and later grew to appreciate my advice to simply jump right in. At the time Deven was a special education teacher and later he became a librarian (which you can read about here). Because of his intellect and insights, it wasn’t long before Deven became quite well-known in the world of education.

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Posted by on in School Culture

dance

This is just one in a series of ongoing posts on the educational innovations in Israel. You can see additional coverage here.

New York City (the place I teach) is indeed a melting pot, and while New Yorkers embrace its diversity, teaching in a school where students are not fluent in English, and often are not even literate in their own language, is challenging. Students are often unable to perform at grade level, not because of their capacity to learn, but because of their capacity to understand the language. What’s more, after just one year in the country, foreign-born students are expected to perform on the same standardized tests as native speakers. When they don’t, there’s a domino effect: the student is labeled a failure. His parent feels like a failure. His teacher a failure, and if there are many such students in attendance, the school is labeled a failure. The failure however is not the student, teacher, or school. The failure is the a school system that is failing these students.  

What if there was a way to change this scenario?

As one of five bloggers invited to be a part of #VibeIsrael’s #VibeEdu Education Innovation tour I had the chance to visit a school where none of this is the case. The Bialik Rogozin School provides a unique model where refugees and children of migrant workers, some of them with little or no schooling at all, are integrated into Israeli society with common sense educational strategies that any school or district could adopt.

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Posted by on in Education Technology

Twitter used to be very clear that you had to be 13 to use their site. In fact, if you look at the image in this post (or at the prior terms of service), you can see that previously, it was the first bullet in the "Basic Terms" section.

On September 18, 2009, Twitter released a new Terms of Service that omitted the age requirement which you can see here https://twitter.com/tos. Additionally, Twitter does not ask your age when creating an account. They also have safety tips for parents that do not mention an age requirement and they announced an age screening policy that indicates Twitter account holders can determine what age you must be for use. This might appear to indicate that there is only an age requirement to engage with certain Twitter accounts.

However, their privacy policy says this:

Our Policy Towards Children: Our Services are not directed to persons under 13. If you become aware that your child has provided us with personal information without your consent, please contact us at privacy@twitter.com. We do not knowingly collect personal information from children under 13. If we become aware that a child under 13 has provided us with personal information, we take steps to remove such information and terminate the child's account. You can find additional resources for parents and teens here.

This (If you become aware that your child has provided us with personal information without your consent)
could be interpreted as Twitter requiring parental consent under 13. However, this (If we become aware that a child under 13 has provided us with personal information, we take steps to remove such information and terminate the child's account.) could be interpreted as 13 being the age requirement.

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Tagged in: Social Media Twitter

Posted by on in What If?

This is just one in a series of ongoing posts on the educational innovations in Israel. You can see additional coverage here.

When Michael Biton took the role as Mayor of Yeruham, a small desert city, made up of about 10,000 mostly Israeli immigrants he had some challenges to realize one of his visions for the city. Known for it’s historical and archeological sites, the city was to become a sought-after tourism hot-spot. One that, among other things, offers sumptuous ethnic meals and gives visitors insight into the heritage, culture, and traditions of regular Israelis.

But first, he had to overcome a couple problems:

  1. The small town couldn’t afford any restaurants. The market was too small.
  2. There was a high unemployment rate for women

Fortunately, Biton had a recipe for success that included a combination of exploration, motivation, and innovation with a dash of chutzpah.

He recognized that there were some homes in city that had become hubs for community meals. From these homes the aroma of home-cooked, traditional recipes made mouths water. Fulfilling Jewish values of hospitality, caring, and solidarity, these families welcomed their neighbors into their homes.

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