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Jay Eitner  @iSuperEit

Jay Eitner @iSuperEit

Jay Eitner is a proud product of the New Jersey public schools. A graduate from Union High School in 1997, Jay attended The American University in Washington DC with a BA in interdisciplinary studies. He began his teaching career in Roselle, NJ teaching a variety of subjects including social studies, computers, and digital literacy. Known for being ‘outside of the box’ and for strong technology infusion, Eitner strived to make a learning environment that was student centered, data driven, and technology infused. Jay received his Masters Degree from Kean University in 2004 and was hired to teach 8th grade social studies in the nationally recognized East Brunswick Public Schools. During his time in East Brunswick, Eitner has written & received over $140,000 in grants for his students. Grants ranged from podcasting equipment to creating a fully-interactive gold-rush experience, where students dug for gold during their westward expansion unit. Jay obtained his supervisor, principal, and school administrator certificates from the NJPSA NJ-EXCEL program in 2009. Administratively, Eitner has served as a middle school Assistant Principal in the Washington Township Schools , a K-12 Supervisor of Social Studies in the Hopewell Valley Regional School District, and a Superintendent of the Lower Alloways Creek School District. Jay currently serves as a Superintendent of Schools for the Waterford Township School District. He has presented a series of workshops on digital leadership, technology infusion, and student achievement. Recent awards include the 2015 national Educators Voice Award in the category of Superintendent, the White House MakerSpace distinction, and named to the national Academy of Arts & Sciences as a 2016 Educator To Watch.

Jay currently resides in Mount Laurel, New Jersey and is a proud Dad of twin girls and his puppy Lola.

Posted by on in School Culture


When people talk about childhood idols and heroes, I always say David Copperfield.  No, not the character from Dickens.  The other character:

image credit: vegas.com

If you don’t know of the man above, David Copperfield is an international illusionist who has performed all over the world.  He did a series of specials in the 80’s and 90’s on television and currently performs daily in Las Vegas.

David Copperfield wasn’t just simple magic. There was spectacle; there were music and lights; there was a story; there was the attractive girl; there was the impossible becoming possible in a few minutes.  Illusions were almost performed like MTV music videos.  I was obsessed.

My love for illusions and magic was instantaneous. There was a magic shop in town that I was stopping in every day after school to either learn a trick or save up lunch money (sorry Mom) and buy a new trick each week.  At one point, I had a duffle bag full of all sorts of tricks.

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Posted by on in Education Leadership

education conference

With the school year going into full swing, so are many of the weekend September festivities; festivals, football, and fall TV. For educators, it is also a time for weekend conferences, workshops, and edcamps.

Ever since becoming a Superintendent, I have been faced with the same questions at least once a week; below is a simple Q & A for you.

"Why do  you still participate in EdCamps, conferences, and weekend workshops?" 

Simple answer: because I enjoy them. I enjoy learning at these workshops. I enjoy learning from others and with other.  I enjoy networking.  Most importantly, I enjoy seeing how other students are learning and how I can harness their triumphs for my students and teachers.

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Posted by on in ShiftParadigm


Never did I ever think there would be a 'part deux' to  blogging about speaking in The White House, until it happened again. Most people don't get invited to the White House, let alone twice. It's humbling, it's surreal, it's one of those experiences that you get to share with your kids and their kids.

About a month ago, I received an invitation from the Office of Science & Technology to attend both the #CSforAll forum and a PD session on what other districts from around the US and its' territories are doing. These meetings are the results of numerous initiatives from The President with the goal of getting computer science classes, programs, clubs, activities, or all of the above into all schools. While it sounds like a very broad and ambitious goal, it is. To give every student the skills needed in order to succeed in today's society has always been prized as a local initiative. However, when the President of the United States sets an initiative, you want to follow through on it, and use every resource you can.

The workshop in the AM was fantastic; it contained leaders, teachers, government officials, and students from around the country, US territories, and even Native American Tribes.  I got to hear about how uber-wealthy, dirt poor, gigantic, minuscule, districts had students writing code from grades K to 12. I heard about how a southern California high school  rolled out a series of CS classes; I heard how a school district of over 230 schools in Florida started an hour of code and turned it into a massive community outpouring.  I was floored with how a tribe in Oklahoma has Kindergarten students coding on the reservation. Meeting students where they are is an understatement.

The afternoon was a summit with national partners that highlighted students, companies, colleges, public & private schools, and the government have come together to promote computer science for all.   From the Girl Scouts to Megan Smith, the Chief Technology Officer of the United States, it was a fascinating afternoon.

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Posted by on in Education Leadership

public speaking

So… here we are again…another summer that flies by, another school year ready to kick off, and another few weeks of thoughts swirling in my head about what exactly to say to the hundreds of staff members who wait for my every last breath. You know the last sentence was sarcasm, right?  I used to despise listening to administrators giving speeches to begin the school year.  As a teacher, I already had so much to do, a classroom to set up, curriculum and IEP’s to look over, etc. The last thing I wanted to do was be herded in like cattle to sit and listen to some know-it-all administrator tell me how I’m going to do my job and how wonderful I am, even though he had never met me.

And now I am “that guy.”   I don’t like being “that guy.”  You know… “That guy” who cuts in front of you in the lunch line, “’that guy” who just has to have the last word, “that guy”’ who has been the gift to education since he stepped into a classroom and knows absolutely everything.

I don’t like the labels “good guy” or “bad guy” either.  My job isn’t a movie plot or a professional wrestling storyline.  However, some will correlate good guy and bad guy, because that’s what was always done.

Some people will call me a good guy, some a bad guy, or, even worse, “that guy.”  While I don’t think I fit any of these personas, I’ll tell you what I think I am. I am the guy.

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Posted by on in UNward!

Another packed room for the Dirty 30 v.4.0!

I'll admit it - I'm an edcamp  junkie. I love spending my own time on weekends or using my vacation days to go learn something new about what's happening in schools. I'm passionate about my craft, 24/7. 

Kyle Calderwood kicks off #tmnj16

Over the years, the edcamp  movement has exploded, but there is also another Un-conference  that is gaining major traction: TeachMeet. Today, I attended my third TeachMeetNJ in Toms River.

73 teachers partook in BreakoutEDU

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