EDWORDS: Latest Blog Posts

  • It's All About the Driving Question!

    It was a graduate course called "Technology-Assisted Project Based Learning" where I learned this phrase - the Driving Question. But should a driving question exclusively belong to Project-Based Learning or should it be embedded into any kind of learning? And, if yes, perhaps there are even more components that can be "borrowed" as well? Let's review Project-Based Learning first. Question 1: Define Project-Based Learning Answer: The key words for PBL are: innovative, intrinsic motivati ...

    0
    by Tsisana Palmer
    Friday, 27 March 2015
  • The Invisible People in Your School

    Right now, there are invisible people in your school. No, not some sort of ghosts like those who haunt people in books and movies; in your school are students who are “invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see” them for who they are (not unlike the unnamed narrator in Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man who’s self-description is quoted here). They’re largely unnoticed, many are compliant, and all are disconnected. Some of them think this is the only way they’ll e ...

    by Aaron Hogan
    Thursday, 26 March 2015
  • Technology Resources for Busy Teachers

    After 17 years in the classroom, I understand how difficult it can be for teachers to keep up on the rapidly changing world of educational technology on top of all of the other responsibilities that come their way. That's why I’m excited to join EDWords to exchange ideas with fellow educators.  My goal is to share resources with everyone from the novice to the tech enthusiast.  I’ll share classroom tested technology resources that are intended to solve problems and make your life ...

    0
    by Nick LaFave
    Wednesday, 25 March 2015
  • b2ap3_thumbnail_Children-Modeling-Who_20150324-195718_1.jpg

    Where Do Children Learn To Speak To Each Other? Modeling Who?

    When children are playing, it is a good time to see how they talk and treat one another. They model you! Children watch everything you do and then translate it into their language. They imitate you in their attempt to get ideas on how to connect,talk and get what they want from their friends. They watch your body language and your facial expressions. What kind of example are you providing for your children? Are they yelling, huffing and puffing, telling little white lies, and controlling what ...

    0
    by Karen Stone
    Tuesday, 24 March 2015
  • Touching & Impressive Story - Technology Strengthens Humanity!

    Continuous effort–not strength or intelligence–is the key to unlocking our potential.– Winston Churchill It's all about our students. We say this, we write this, we educators truly mean this! An example of how and why we all do what we do in education is captured in the video shared in this blog post. At Caruso Middle School in the Communications Media Arts class, teacher Julie Witczak engages, inspires, and empowers students each and every day!   In the video below, "Brothers" "... ...

    0
    by Michael Lubelfeld
    Tuesday, 24 March 2015
View more blog entries
  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Archives
    Archives Contains a list of blog posts that were created previously.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Recent blog posts

Posted by on in General

It was a graduate course called "Technology-Assisted Project Based Learning" where I learned this phrase - the Driving Question. But should a driving question exclusively belong to Project-Based Learning or should it be embedded into any kind of learning? And, if yes, perhaps there are even more components that can be "borrowed" as well?

Let's review Project-Based Learning first.

Question 1: Define Project-Based Learning

Answer: The key words for PBL are: innovative, intrinsic motivation, higher-order thinking, authentic learning, 21st century skills, problem solving, engagement, collaboration, effective communication, students' inquiry, student-driven, and teacher-facilitated. Music to teachers' ears! Describing briefly, PBL is an innovative approach to learning which allows students to identify a concept of interest, conduct the research, and critically analyze the findings. Thus, learning becomes student-driven, as opposed to teacher-driven, which, in turn, increases the level of students' motivation and engagement. Last but not least, PBL is not a "supplementary activity" to support learning; it is the curriculum concept taught through a project (Bell, 2010.)

...

Posted by on in Education Leadership

Right now, there are invisible people in your school.

No, not some sort of ghosts like those who haunt people in books and movies; in your school are students who are “invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see” them for who they are (not unlike the unnamed narrator in Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man who’s self-description is quoted here).

They’re largely unnoticed, many are compliant, and all are disconnected. Some of them think this is the only way they’ll ever experience school; after all, they missed the welcome to high school orientation, they’re not sure who to talk to about sports or clubs, and their older siblings preceded them in living the invisible high school life (maybe graduating, maybe not). So why expect anything different?

They’re in more of our classrooms than we’d guess, even in unlikely places–places where lots of people are, where people look like everything is ok, where school doesn’t seem to be a struggle, where students live in poverty or affluence or alone or in fear.

But do we even know who they are?

...

Posted by on in Tools, Shortcuts, Resources

After 17 years in the classroom, I understand how difficult it can be for teachers to keep up on the rapidly changing world of educational technology on top of all of the other responsibilities that come their way. That's why I’m excited to join EDWords to exchange ideas with fellow educators.  My goal is to share resources with everyone from the novice to the tech enthusiast.  I’ll share classroom tested technology resources that are intended to solve problems and make your life easier, while increasing opportunities for creativity, critical thinking, communication, and collaboration in your classroom.   My hope is that these concise posts will help teachers incorporate more technology in their classrooms, preparing our students to be digitally literate citizens.

Understanding that teachers are busy, I’ll share new EdTech resources with a brief description as to how it can help teachers improve instruction and student learning.  I hope you’ll follow these posts (you can subscribe below) and join the conversation in the comments.  I look forward to sharing and learning.

 

During presentations and workshops, I'm often asked how to edit YouTube videos (without the hassle of complicated editing software).  My first EdTech resource, TubeChop, is an easy way for teachers to put together the parts of a YouTube video they want their students to watch.  Read more below:

 logo-tubechop  

...

Posted by on in General

b2ap3_thumbnail_Children-Modeling-Who_20150324-195718_1.jpg

When children are playing, it is a good time to see how they talk and treat one another. They model you! Children watch everything you do and then translate it into their language. They imitate you in their attempt to get ideas on how to connect,talk and get what they want from their friends. They watch your body language and your facial expressions. What kind of example are you providing for your children? Are they yelling, huffing and puffing, telling little white lies, and controlling what is happening?

I have watched children in preschool playing with their classmates and lo and behold I learn how they are spoken to at home, how the adults speak to one another and who controls what is happening in their homes. I have watched children in elementary classes out on the playground, playing a game and working as a team. I then learn how it is being done at home.

When children hit their teens, they begin to model their peers and want to portray those who seem to be popular and are getting the attention they crave. And we wonder why cyber-bullying is so rampant amongst this age group. We also haven’t been able to stop it.

I will take it one step further. Married couples more often than not model the relationship their parents had and so childhood behavior patterns continue and we pass them on from one generation to another.

...
Video shared by on in Education Leadership

Continuous effort–not strength or intelligence–is the key to unlocking our potential.
– Winston Churchill

It's all about our students. We say this, we write this, we educators truly mean this! An example of how and why we all do what we do in education is captured in the video shared in this blog post. At Caruso Middle School in the Communications Media Arts class, teacher Julie Witczak engages, inspires, and empowers students each and every day!

 

In the video below, "Brothers" "...is a story told by an 8th grader about his 6th grade brother and the bond they have." I asked Julie to share with me the background from class about this awesome video project:

From Julie: "It actually started when we watched the movie "Front of the Class". I carried this piece over from Skills 4 Life because it is an inspiring movie about a man who has Tourettes Syndrome and it took him 25 interviews to get a teaching job.  At the end of the movie, we talked about abilities and I noticed that Jake didn't say much at all.  I approached him after and said "How come you didn't share?" He said sometimes it is hard to share because it can be emotional.  I said well you have a great story to share, maybe you should make a video so you can share your thoughts.  <strong>The assignment was for 8th graders to create a video that tells a story they want to share with the world.  They could really do anything and Jake decided to share his story.  The cool part is that three other kids were involved with it and needed no credit at all or to be featured in the video.  I was super impressed with them as most 8th graders enjoy their "stage time".   

...