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A Good School

Posted by on in School Culture
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Earlier this month, I wrote about our children starting at a new school. It’s a “good school”, that’s what everyone says. About their old school, they said less flattering things; "it’s a rough school, a bad school". I always felt like I was on some kind of affirmative action campaign, trying to dispel those myths because, well, we loved that school. It was a great school.

Now, the new school is a good school too but my point here is that the perceptions we have about our local schools are very often based on little more than dust in the wind, snippets of conversation and rumours.  Sometimes the perception is entirely based on standardized test scores and media reports about them – a very narrow window into a very big world.

I spent last week working in a school that is very much like the school my children used to attend. If you asked around at swimming lessons, or on the side of the soccer field, you might hear that this school is a bad school. You might assume negative things about the students or the staff. You might avoid it for your own children.  You would be wrong, very wrong.

It is a great school. I witnessed amazing teaching last week and I was so impressed by the ways that these teachers and administrators were carefully considering how to best serve their students. I didn't hear a single disparaging comment about a child or a family and I witnessed incredible compassion. Those kids need great teachers and they have them.

We who hang out on the sides of soccer fields, holding Starbucks lattes in our hands need to think carefully about how we define good schools and how we talk about all schools. Is it really just about the test scores? Don’t we want more from schools than test scores? I know I sure do.  The demographics of a school are not its destiny and numbers never tell the whole story.

Maybe we should hold our opinions, like the foam on our lattes, until we’ve walked a mile in those hallways.

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Emily Caruso Parnell is the K-12 Arts Education Consultant in the Rainbow District School Board in Northern Ontario. Since beginning her teaching career in 2001, she has taught all grades from Kindergarten to Grade 12. She has taught in public, private, and independent schools, including teaching the IB Primary Years Programme and as the Arts-lead member of the local leadership team for Ontario's Early Learning Kindergarten Program. Emily is a Dance educator who holds an MA in Dance from the University of North Carolina Greensboro as well as a Bachelor of Education from the University of New Brunswick, an HBA from York University and is a Registered Teacher of the Royal Academy of Dance. Her writing is regularly featured in the PHE Canada Journal and she sits on the Program Advisory Committee for Dance Education of Physical and Health Education Canada. Emily is passionate about education in, about, and through the Arts as well as experiential learning, parent engagement, play, and as much time spent outdoors as possible. She strives to bring the same enthusiasm and energy to parenting her own young children.
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Guest Saturday, 22 October 2016