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Posted by on in Early Childhood

Anyone who has young children, teaches them, or has spent time with one knows that “Why?” is their master question. Once it starts, there’s no stopping it. Although adults do their best to come up with answers, the interrogation becomes an endless loop. When one question is answered, the next one comes right on its heels. And yet another and then another.

painful

Soon, the adult feels like there’s no escape. He looks for a way out… changing the subject or pointing out something new. But then the new direction triggers a renewed barrage of “Why’s.” Geesh. This can be tiresome. Nonetheless, it is incredibly important for children. New connections are being made in their brains at an astounding rate. They are trying to figure things out and understand how things work. They’re not only learning, but learning about how to learn.

Research tells us that children have a curious, scientific drive from the very beginning, even before birth. Those of us who have spent time around toddlers and preschoolers have seen them behave like little investigators. They are curious and observant, using all their senses to soak up information. When something new or unexpected happens or when they figure something out, they just light up.

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Posted by on in Early Childhood

bedtime

So, adults generally agree on the importance of children’s intellectual development. Throughout the day, we are creating a multitude of opportunities for learning, both intentional and unintentional. Helping a child expand his mind and grow cognitively is essential, but so is something else- developing his character and supporting his social/emotional development. Oh, my. There’s a tall order.

In our day-to-day, multitasking, so-much-on our-plate society, adults often have trouble taking a moment to reflect on how they themselves are handling their own emotions and social interactions, let alone someone else’s. But, you better believe that children are watching it all and learning from us… the good, the bad, and often, the ugly.

We must be more intentional about cultivating the things that will ultimately help children to be better human beings- the way they treat other people, the tone and attitude they will someday use in their own homes, the way they will handle their relations with family, and the way they will engage with their communities.

Well, now. That’s easier said than done. And, when during a family’s busy day, can this best be accomplished? Experts say there are three specific times that have the best potential for a meaningful connection between parent and child… in the first 15 minutes after a child gets home from school, at the family dinner table, and just before bed.

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Posted by on in Early Childhood

soccer ball

Generally speaking, most parents can’t wait to get their young children into activities. They want to do something that’s out of the house or outdoors. They’re anxious to find out what their child’s talents might be and signing them up for a team seems like a good first step in that direction.

But, there are a few things to consider before paying that enrollment fee and piling everyone in the car.

First, be sure the activity is specifically geared to 3 to 5-year-olds. Some are more for 5’s and 6’s. In other words, all pee wee soccer teams are not what parents might expect. They need to take the time to watch a session and observe the set-up and coaching. Is it highly structured and regimented, with the emphasis on performance and winning? Or, is it more like fun running games while learning some very basic skills?

Parents should remember that an active 3-year-old is not going to look like any kind of athlete. He is typically a bundle of unorganized energy, with an amazing inability to follow directions, pay attention, or listen.

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Posted by on in Early Childhood

swing set

On my way to work, I pass no fewer than 6 child care centers. As my life revolves around Early Childhood and young children, I am always interested in seeing what’s happening in programs in the community. It had been puzzling to me, no matter the weather or time of day, how few children I ever saw playing outside. In the winter, when it was approaching 40 degrees, after a fresh snow- no children. In the fall, it was sunny and windy and leaves were everywhere- nobody. In the spring, it had just rained, the sun was out, but all I saw were abandoned play areas.

It first, it was a curiosity, but as the seasons changed and the pattern persisted, I was concerned why there was this lack of outdoor, physical activity in child care.

I decided to do some unofficial investigating and started asking child care staff if they had some answers. Boy, did I get an earful!

The staffers very often cited children’s clothing as the problem. They said parents send their children in clothes not meant to get dirty or in shoes not safe for playground surfaces or equipment. It was also reported that parents, in their hurry to get out the door in the morning, forget jackets or hats or boots. A couple care providers even expressed their belief that some parents did these things on purpose, so their children would have to stay indoors.

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Posted by on in Early Childhood

b2ap3_thumbnail_swing.jpg

When I get the chance to speak to groups about DAP I cover a lot of ground.

I talk about things like:

The importance of respecting childhood, the developmental process, and individual learners.

The critical nature of appropriate, foundational early learning experiences.

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