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Closing the School Year: Do Something Spectacular!

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Lots of advice for any teacher this time of year tends to focus on making it to the end of the year. You know how it is: Lots of gritting our teeth and grimly hanging on until the very end. What a miserable way to spend even one minute of our lives, much less convey that attitude to our students. If we are as miserable as the gloomy advice would make it seem, just think how miserable our students must feel.

Instead of glumly counting the days until we can be freed from the prison that school is assumed to be this time of year, how doing something---well, spectacular? And by spectacular, think fireworks, cheers, applause, celebrations, a huge smile on every student’s face.

Changing a negative mindset this time year can change everything. It’s a sure win-win. Best of all, it is pretty easy to be spectacular. Here’s how.

1. Hold a classroom awards ceremony. Celebrate the little things that have made the year special: most improved, neatest papers, most cooperative…the list is endless. Involve student input. Advertise it. Count down to it. Fun for everyone.

2. Surprise students with a bulletin board dedicated to their accomplishments. Take sneaky photos of them working and print them out. Then, use bright paper to spell out their successes. Maybe a Top Ten list of the best moments of the year.

3. Have students write each other thank you notes for the kind things they did for each other during the year.

4. Hold a Teach-a Thon to prepare for final exams or end of the year standardized tests. You can manage it, but students can be the actual teachers. They can hold review games, check papers, quiz each other, set up work stations. Have fun working together.

5. Bury a class time capsule to be opened when they graduate. Fill it with notes to their future selves, headline clippings, and other fun memorabilia to celebrate how much they've learned this year.

6. Hold a charity event where students work together to help others less fortunate. Online games such as Free Rice are wonderful for this. Locally, there are many organizations that could use student volunteers or donations. The key to making this type of project spectacular is that students will be having fun with classmates while making the world a better place for everyone.

7. Turn review sessions into sporting tournaments. Hold an Olympics or a World Series or a Stanley Cup Playoff. Have students make up rules and procedures and have a blast!

8. Break out giant sheets of bulletin board paper and have students write advice to next year’s students. They can outline each other’s hands or feet and write their names on it as well. You benefit from the relaxed time now as well as with a wonderful bulletin board to start school next fall.

9. Have students make two or three paper airplanes each. Then, have them write facts related to the material understudy on the wings. Take everyone outside and fly the planes. Students have to pick up someone else’s plane, read the information, and fly it again. Chaos? Yes. Fun. Yes. Learning. Yes. Spectacular? You bet.

10. Somehow, find the time to write each child a two or three sentence note about his or her strengths and accomplishments. Wish them well during the next year. Tell them you will miss them. These will sure to be treasured for a long time. And what could be more spectacular than that?

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Julia G. Thompson received her BA in English from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg. She has been a teacher in the public schools of Virginia, Arizona, and North Carolina for more than thirty-five years. Thompson has taught a variety of courses, including freshman composition at Virginia Tech, English in all of the secondary grades, mining, geography, reading, home economics, math, civics, Arizona history, physical education, special education, graduation equivalency preparation, and employment skills. Her students have been diverse in ethnicity as well as in age, ranging from seventh graders to adults. Thompson currently teaches in Fairfax County, Virginia, where she is an active speaker and consultant. Author of Discipline Survival Guide for the Secondary Teacher, First-Year Teacher’s Checklist, The First-Year Teacher’s Survival Guide, and The First-Year Teacher’s Survival Guide Professional Development Training Kit, Thompson also provides advice on a variety of subjects through her Web site, www.juliagthompson.com; on her blog, juliagthompson.blogspot.com; and on Twitter at https://twitter.com/TeacherAdvice.

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Guest Sunday, 04 December 2016