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Music Makes It Better

Posted by on in Early Childhood
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children playing music

Music makes everything better. I recently gave a presentation about this topic to caregivers and teachers in Fredericksburg, Virginia. I emphasized the tremendous importance of music experiences for young children, talked about using music and movement for behavior management, and gave examples. The attendees were enthusiastic. Many have used clean-up songs and hand-washing songs for a while. But they weren’t aware of the power of using music to elevate or calm mood, or the power of movement to smooth transitions, something my friend, Rae Pica, speaks of so eloquently on her new YouTube Channel.

I work in a quality child care center. We sing directions all the time. We make up the tunes, or use old favorite tunes with the appropriate words (to the tune of "If you’re Happy and You Know It": “Put your bottom on the rug, on the rug. Put your bottom on the rug…and give yourself a hug. Put your bottom on the rug, on the rug.” Or anything else you can think of!

I talked about what I call “waiting songs”. What are waiting songs? Why do children have to wait? In a perfect world, they shouldn’t have to, but it happens. My example to them was that sometimes the whole group is outfitted for the cold and someone suddenly has to go to the bathroom. Yes, we had them go ahead of time, but nature calls again, sometimes, and we need to accommodate. One of my waiting songs is a Raffi tune called, “Something in my shoe”. You can look on YouTube for it (but learn to sing it! Do not use a video when a live teacher is available!). At the end, the children mime, with the teacher, going to bed. So the song can be used as an activity that morphs into a settling down song before a story as well.

Wee must never waste children’s time. Having them sit still while someone “goes” is wasting their time. Asking them to join you in a waiting song gives them the opportunity to move and sing. They are practicing math skills (rhythm, rhyme, and language patterns). The steady beat of a song nurtures attention skills. Dare I say it prevents squabbling, also? It does.

There is good evidence in the academic literature to demonstrate that early music experiences are crucial to the later development of young children. Teachers must never be shy about doing whatever they can to learn about music (and movement) activities so that they can go beyond the ordinary.

Another tip I shared with my attendees was the idea of music centers. Putting percussion instruments with a CD player (playing Afro Pop, Cuban jazz, or Carl Orff, for example) is the way we provide improvisational outlets for our children. If some children are feeling feisty, give them drums! They will unknowingly develop their attention and math skills as well as express their exuberance in a creative way.

There is no limit to the power of music in the classroom. Take advantage of that awesome power!

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Gail teaches Early Childhood Education as an Adjunct Associate Professor for Northern Virginia Community College, one of the largest community college systems in the country. She is a popular trainer in the DC area, leading workshops on such topics as Engaging, Arts-Based and Outdoor Learning, and Guiding Behavior. She is a member of the Virginia Community College Peer Group which collaborates with the Virginia Department of Social Services to train and license childcare professionals throughout the state. Her blog on BAM's EdWords is referenced in several arts websites, and is used in Early Childhood courses throughout Virginia. She is also a member of NAREA, the North American Reggio Emilia Alliance. You can contact her for more information about Professional Development opportunities. 


Gail lives and works in Northern Virginia. Her special interests include arts-integration, play, Reggio Emilia, music and yoga. 

  • Guest
    joan Ehrlich Wednesday, 15 March 2017

    This is beautifully explained. Just thinking about those tunes and imagining the students waiting patiently for their friend, makes me feel relaxed.

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Guest Friday, 15 December 2017