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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in academic integrity

Posted by on in Education Leadership

Just my Opinion, but….

JUST SAY NO to standardized testing. It’s time. Right before elections it’s turning into a political football, local, state and federal. At the national level, the leap to ‘for profit’ schools, slaps us into the face of reality.

Tests. Lower the bar, fix or dump the tests? A conundrum. Is the bar too high? If no kids can reach that bar, what’s next? Same thing, same results, right? Or what? Is this the way to judge schools, teachers and children’s future success in our changing landscape? Does rigor insure academic success? I think not.

Something is more than a little off kilter, the ship is going out to sea in the wrong direction. In fact, we are bailing water out of this boat. New ship needed! Let’s stop being on the Titanic, rearranging deck chairs.

Because I am an optimistic person by nature, and always see the good in things, or nearly, I am confident we can turn the tide here, as a collective voice. Because policy makers usually have not been teachers, or even spent any time in a classroom, the new wave of teacher educators running for political office at all levels is heartening.

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Posted by on in Social Emotional Learning

Authentic teaching is magical balance. A good teacher knows how to reveal the essence of our existence so that we are moved to compassion, so that we respond with kindness and humanity even in the face of adversity, so that we are aware of the beautiful now, while our eyes are wide open to the potential of tomorrow.

How do we find this magical balance and inspire students in an age of uncertainty? This has been an intense year for all of us. I wonder a lot about the long-term impact of world events on our individual and collective well-being. How will social, political and environmental upheaval influence how we approach teaching for the future?

My work with teachers this week gave me joy but also concern. I was reminded how vulnerable teachers are in our collective struggle, loss and disappointment. I admire how teachers continue to find humor in any situation and courageously inject honesty at unexpected moments.

I met a kind teacher who does outstanding work. Sadly, she faces an overcrowded class of special education students every day without any support in the classroom. This is not unusual. Still, I get impatient. I want to embolden teachers like her to advocate for themselves, to challenge the conditions of their schools and classrooms, to believe in the possibility of a balanced, healthy life and professional working conditions.

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Posted by on in Teaching Strategies

 

 

Girl students Yabucoa

At this point, it might be useful for us to ask ourselves…what is this act, what is this scene in which action is taking place, what is this agency and what is its purpose?”

Ralph Ellison, Lecture to Teachers, 1963

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Posted by on in Education Resources

cheerful-group-kids-wtih-their-teacher.jpg

When it comes to rewarding children for good behavior or a job well done, educators need to be mindful, since going overboard can actually lead to serious problems down the road. 

Positive affirmation can encourage your students to work hard, and it can be good incentive in this digital age where things like smartphones, tablets, video games, and social media all compete for the attention of the youth. In light of these realities, rewards definitely have a place. 

Even so, there is evidence that rewards, particularly as it relates to food, can potentially have unintended negative consequences that could follow children well past their early years. 

Fortunately, there is a way to strike a balance so that you can keep your students motivated both to do well and to be on their best behavior. 

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Posted by on in Education Resources

Our students don't know the world without the Internet. They spend days and nights on YouTube, Twitter, Instagram, or Snapchat but hardly know how to translate all the information into learning. Gen Z doesn't necessarily think critically about what they find online, and we, as educators, should teach the academic side of the Internet to them.

Why is it so important?

  1. Surveys demonstrate that many students don't understand how to use online sources to support their arguments.
  2. Studies show that young people don't focus on the credibility of sources they use: they can't explain why they choose certain websites, authors, and publications.
  3. Online research skills are among must-haves for students' progress through college life and future career.

Educators can help students to evaluate online information efficiently. Its volume keeps growing (500+ new websites appear every minute), and it's significant for young people to know how to separate the gems from the garbage and become critical consumers, not just viewers.

So, how can we help youngsters do efficient online research and navigate information easily?

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