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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in American education
Posted by on in Education Leadership

caroline-hernandez-315551.jpg

I was taught that the way of progress was neither swift nor easy. — Marie Curie

Translation: If you want things to change, get your ass off the couch and do the work.

That's what Marie did. In a world full of men unwilling to accept a woman, an atheist, and a person who followed her heart, she had to work her ass off to overcome the sexism and xenophobia of her times.

In 1911, just before receiving her Nobel Prize, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences asked Marie not to come to Stockholm, so King Gustav V would not be subjected to shaking hands with an adulteress.

Of course, she went to accept the award in person. That was her second Nobel. She was the first ever woman to receive one, and the first ever person to receive two. She discovered radium and polonium and coined the term radioactivity. She earned many prestigious awards, honors, and posts for her work.

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Posted by on in Education Leadership

turningbacktime

I still can't believe that I graduated Union High School 20 years ago this year. 1997 was a fun year–a senior in high school, not a care in the world. Then again, it was a different world.

My superintendent, Dr. Jakubowski (with whom I still speak), made two prominent points at our graduation.

1. Don't get into a stranger's car.

2. Don't use the internet.

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Posted by on in General
We-Make-It-Great2.jpg
 
Tomorrow, America gets a new president. Some view it as the apocalypse. Others see Donald Trump as the savior.
 
Surely, things will change. Things always change. But who we are does not have to.
 
Politicians would have us believe our future is in their hands. But this is wrong.

No one's getting the American Dream, a car, or even a pony when Trump takes office. We'll still have to think, hustle, and put skills to use to get these things if we want them. No one is getting saved.

And it's all good because...

We learn so that we can think.

We believe in people and in ourselves so we can persevere. 

We work together so we can gain skills.

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Posted by on in General

dream

With hope in my heart and passion in my soul I am reposting last year's MLK inspired missive. This year, more important than ever, may we recognize Dr. King's aspirations and belief in the future success stories for all America's children. 

Tonight my heart is filled with joy. As we welcome the successes of the New Year, I have faith in the future of our public schools. This is the perfect time to celebrate!

Dr. Martin Luther King's birthday, January 15th is here. This date marks my 46th year as a teacher. It doesn't get better than that. And here I am, still teaching, now in a preschool, hopefully making a difference.

I was born on Dr. Martin Luther King's birthday. Perhaps that is why I have always had such a strong social conscience. I've been teaching reading nearly my whole life. When I was six, I was dragging neighborhood kids into my 'schoolroom'. Being a Principal was logical and a highlight of my career.

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Posted by on in ** Sponsored Post **

“Mister, why do we have to do this? I’d honestly rather work on math right now. Or anything else.”

This was advisory class (also known as “guidance”). I was a certified high school math teacher, but like so many of my peers, I also taught advisory. In advisory, teachers met with students to develop their social skills and help them explore college and career options. The class sounds practical, particularly because I taught in New York City alternative high schools serving at-risk students.

 Oddly enough, New York City’s academic policy mentions advisory only once, in a footnote:

“There are no standards in ‘guidance’ or ‘advisory’; such courses may only bear credit if they are taught by appropriate subject certified teachers…”

This might explain why advisory was so often treated as an afterthought in New York City public schools. We weren’t provided thoughtful or engaging curriculum and yet, every student took advisory multiple times in a year to accumulate elective credits and meet graduation requirements. I rarely felt underprepared teaching math, but unfortunately it was advisory that helped me perfect the art of improvising.

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