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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in career

Posted by on in What If?

There are conversations in all of our lives that we have repeatedly.

"Did you brush your teeth? Are you sure?"

"Do you have to pee? Please try to go before you put your snow pants on."

"Where is/are your lunch box/agenda/library book/snow pants/mitts?!? The bus is coming!"

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Posted by on in General

reading on plan

Sitting on a plane is typically not my favorite thing to do. However, it’s been a great time for me to catch up on reading. I have no excuses not to; no screaming kids (that are mine), no texts, and I even try to refrain from Netflix.

I read a book review of Do Over by Jon Acuff a few weeks back and couldn’t help but to laugh.  The review spoke about how people dread Mondays, their current job, and how people feel stuck in their Groundhog-Day-like jobs (if you don’t get the reference, you need to watch this). Being that I’m always talking or tweeting about how people should leave their job if they are not happy, I was intrigued.

The book eventually delved into a myriad of issues that deal with relationships, skills, character, and hustle. These four qualities help you shape your entire career and how you will proceed.

Some great quotes and takeaways from the book include:

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Posted by on in General

A difficult choice

Leaving the classroom was one of the most difficult things I've ever done. Making the decision was one of the hardest I've ever made. Not only did I have to say goodbye to my colleagues, my administrators, and the mentors who had guided me throughout my career, but I had to leave my students. I say "MY" students purposefully. Regardless of if I taught them 5 years ago, 3 years ago, or I was going to teach them next year (as most teachers know) they areand will always be "MY" students. I wasn't leaving because it was "too hard" or because I was burnt out, though. I was leaving to make a greater impact on education and to reach more students than I ever thought possible.

How it happened

I had developed, tested, and created a system in my classroom now called The Grid Method. In my high needs, urban school with 100% free and reduced lunch, and economically disadvantaged students, it was working. Students were more engaged, achievement was increasing, management was improving, and I quickly realized that I had something here that could help more teachers and more students. Colleagues had been asking how to implement the system I'd designed and so had others I shared it with. I quickly started looking for ways to spread the word and share the techniques and systems I was using to reach more students.

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Posted by on in General

MILITARY

 

This is just one in a series of ongoing posts on the educational innovations in Israel. You can see additional coverage here. 

In the United States, youth have become what school critics like John Taylor Gatto refer to as infantilized. Their days and activities are structured by what adults tell them to do. They view their work as disconnected from them, having little relevance or meaning in their lives.

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Posted by on in School Culture

 About two months ago this young lady (see above) came up to me, gave me a hug and told me she wanted to be a principal when she grows up. 

I smiled, patted her on the back and told her, Go For It!  I told her she would be a fantastic principal. 

As I walked away I had a grin on my face.  My sense of pride was pretty high.  I take being a role model very serious, and for good reason, many of our students will only have a few principals in their lifetime.  I, for one, hope that they look back and remember the positives. 

Then a little later I thought of my advice.  "Go For It!"  Hmmm...would I tell my own boys the same thing?  Would I encourage our youth to become educators?  Is it a satisfying career? 

My mind pondered these questions as I lay in bed one night.  Years ago I didn't plan to become a teacher.  Shoot, I went to college and changed majors twice before I finally discovered my passion.  I still remember sitting in classrooms and I filling out interest surveys.  Each time it had me doing something outdoors and traveling.  The point is, some people find their passion at a young age and others continually search for it.  The trick is, whether you discover it at age 10 or at age 40, it's about doing what you love. 

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