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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Educational Leadership

Posted by on in Education Leadership

I recently participated in a seminar on “student engagement” with new and experienced teachers, principals, vice-principals, and district-level educational leaders. We started with a basic icebreaker activity. We were asked to introduce ourselves by giving our names and sharing one word that reflects a central aspect of our educational philosophy.

My chosen word led to a lot of blank stares and more than a few confused looks.

“Hi, I’m Gillian Judson. My word is perfinker.”

Most people nodded hesitantly, taking on a quizzical look that said …Rrrriiight. And that means? One person I met looked at me skeptically and said, “That’s not a real word, Gillian.”

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Posted by on in Education Leadership

Since January 23, 2017 up until now, I have been busier than I ever have before. New job beginning on January 23, 2017 (interim elementary principal), my wife and I celebrating the birth of our third child on January 24, 2017, back to my old job on March 13, 2017 (6th grade teacher), back to my old-new job on June 2, 2017 (being an interim elementary principal), becoming a Google for Education Certified Trainer in July 2017, starting my new-new job on January 22, 2018 (instructional technology coach), and becoming an Instant Pot believer after many failed attempts in February 2018. 

Along the way I did try to keep up on my blogging, as I had several different drafts going, but I never made time to finish a lot of them. So below are my unfinished drafts, starting with the oldest to the most recent, that I feel I just need to "post" so I can start fresh and keep moving forward. At the end of each, I have added what I was trying to get across in the post. 

"You're not the teacher you were before."

"You are not the same teacher you were before." How would you feel if you were told that? Would you feel upset, or would feel proud? Would you consider it disrepctful or a compliment?

A few weeks ago, my principal told me that statement, and that statement has been ringing in my head ever since. The more I have thought about that statement, the more and more a consider it one of the highest compliments a teacher can receive. Why? Because that means one is a teacher that is actively seeking out change to improve one's practice and learning experience for one's students. It means one is not opening up last year's lesson planner, erasing, and changing the dates. If a teacher is not willing to change to from year to year, then how can a teacher expect their students to be engaged in their learning if there is little thought to lesson design with the students' personalities in mind?

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Posted by on in School Culture

Ah, January.  The lovely time of year when the white stuff makes an appearance, along with wind, ice, sleet, and other trendy terms like "Cyclone-Bomb" "Thunder-Snow" and "Snowpocalypse". While it's always fun to see snowmen, sleigh riding, and images of serenity that would be worthy of your wallpaper, it brings a sense of mystery for those in charge of opening or closing places. For Superintendents, this is one of the more frustrating components of the job. I tweeted about it a few years ago and retweeted it the other day the night before a blizzard was expected:Screen Shot 2018-01-05 at 14.35.50

Besides not being able to correct a misspelling on twitter, I liked the overall message, and so did the 50 others (and 827 who engaged in the tweet, along with the 1927 people who saw the tweet). Twitter allows one to be blunt and get the message out, i.e. my reasoning for hating the calling of snow days.

People ask just what exactly happens when a Superintendent calls a day. There are three necessities I have followed:

  1. You have about 10 web browsers open looking at the weather.
  2. You are a part of a conference call system to see what other Superintendents in your area are planning on doing.
  3. You are in steady contact with the local police Chief and DPW Superintendent.

All three of the above should also rotate around one topic and one topic only: SAFETY. If safety is in play, there is no need to deliberate anything; you close and you're done.

If the buses can't run, you're done. School buses are modern marvels; very different from ten years ago. They are designed to run in all kinds of weather, snow included.  However, safety still has to be considered. AND - the bus drivers who drive the buses need to get to the bus garage.  No bus drivers, no buses.

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Posted by on in Education Leadership

In the last several months we tackled the topic of relationships over rules in the world of students. You can read that post here. This time around, we’re diving into the world of relationships over rules with teachers.

 

As a second year administrator, I (Brent) have a lot still to learn about how to best serve, support, and care for teachers. In my 15 months that I’ve served in this capacity, I’ve made my fair share of mistakes. Some small, some not so much. I’ve had staff in the building tell me how much they appreciate my support and encouragement while at the same time unintentionally doing a terrible job of supporting someone the next hallway over. I heard it said recently that students want a supportive, engaging, encouraging environment where they feel known and cared for. I would venture to say adults merely want the same.

 

As an administrator, I (Jeff) get a unique and humbling vantage point into the blood, sweat, and tears that teachers invest everyday into the lives of kids. I try to make it my goal to ensure that I am not making the life of a teacher any harder. Sadly, I am certain that there are times I have probably placed an additional burden or expectation on the back of the teacher that caused stress. Our role as campus leaders is not positional, but rather to support teachers to be successful as they are on the front lines for kids and families.

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Posted by on in Education Leadership

caroline-hernandez-315551.jpg

I was taught that the way of progress was neither swift nor easy. — Marie Curie

Translation: If you want things to change, get your ass off the couch and do the work.

That's what Marie did. In a world full of men unwilling to accept a woman, an atheist, and a person who followed her heart, she had to work her ass off to overcome the sexism and xenophobia of her times.

In 1911, just before receiving her Nobel Prize, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences asked Marie not to come to Stockholm, so King Gustav V would not be subjected to shaking hands with an adulteress.

Of course, she went to accept the award in person. That was her second Nobel. She was the first ever woman to receive one, and the first ever person to receive two. She discovered radium and polonium and coined the term radioactivity. She earned many prestigious awards, honors, and posts for her work.

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