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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in great teachers

Posted by on in General

crocus3

It's been awhile since I wrote for you and I apologize for that. The good news is I'm still here. I seriously doubted I could get out of the mess I was in, no fault of my own. Life happens.

This is not a blog about my illness, and what happened to me, but it does play a major part in my transformation. Only thing is, I'm not done yet. I remain a work in progress. In fact, I will probably send this blog post out in draft. My hands are still kind of shaky, so the very act of writing this is an act of love.

Being on Twitter and Facebook has been a revelation. After my husband died six years ago, I finished my last book "Reading Champs", a how-to skills guide. Then instead of marketing it, I let it sit on Amazon. I started writing again, left my historic home and property in Northern Calif. to move to Eugene. Unreal, for a nester, I moved three times, volunteered, then taught at the preschool. 

 Family and teaching, the constants in my life. Like breathing. My passion. My gift. Servant leader for more than forty -six years.

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Posted by on in Education Leadership

There are lots of problems in education, big systemic problems, governance problems, structural problems that seem unsolvable sometimes because they’re so deeply rooted in the way things have always be done.  And then there are problems that are so darn easy to fix, it’s a wonder they haven’t already been solved.

One of those easy problems is the tall poppy problem (or syndrome).  If you’re not familiar with that expression, it’s one of those fabulously apt British turns of phrase (also popular in Australia).  Wikipedia defines it as describing “aspects of a culture where people of high status are resented, attacked, cut down and/or criticised simply because they have been classified as superior to their peers.”  While I’m not keen on the term “superior” in their definition, I’m sadly all too familiar with the problem itself; virtually every teacher I know who has moved into a leadership role, whether in their school or in their system has experienced it.  When a poppy gets too tall, we cut it down to size.

“Wow, the superintendent is coming to your class again?!?”

“You’re sure out of the school a lot.”

“Why does she get to go to so many conferences?!?”

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Posted by on in General

angry2.jpg

Oftentimes the most difficult part of an educator’s day is not the curriculum they teach or the long hours they work. For many educators, what keeps us up at night is trying to figure out how to best meet the social and emotional needs of their students. While this is an area in which I am learning everyday, I feel that I have learned some things that may help others find more success with students that seem to struggle to make it through the day.

Start Fresh Each Day

Students that show patters of misbehavior are accustomed to people treating them based on their worst behavior. Don’t be that person! Make it a point to give your students a chance to start each day over. With a smile on your face and a wide open heart.

Earlier this week I had a very difficult encounter with a young lady that I had to keep after school. She screamed at me, she yelled at me and she couldn’t wait to be out of my sight. But the next day I called her into my office. I told her it was a new day and that I loved her and then I gave her a hug.  Before leaving school today she made it a point to come up to me and give me a hug. All students deserve the opportunity to begin each day anew.

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Posted by on in Student Engagement

Today I was working in a busy kindergarten classroom.  I arrived to a room full of activity, bustling with energy, teaming with learning.  The students were engaged at play, active and joyful with the noise of conversation and materials interacting.   A group of boys had build and obstacle course/pathway and they were challenging themselves to jump between the blocks while staying balanced.  Another group was using a mirror to draw self-portraits.  Other children were playing with puppets, painting, and reading. 

After a period of observation, we asked them to leave their play and to join us at the carpet for some music and storytelling.  The teacher tapped the outside of a singing bowl to get their attention and the children slowly began to make their way towards the carpet.  I love singing bowls so I took the opportunity to use it as a way to draw all the students in, playing it by rubbing the outside edge and then slowly moving it across my body so that the sound moved through the room.  The students, familiar with this sound, were transfixed and watched me as I raised and lowered the bowl, moving it from right to left as it vibrated in my hand.

It was a bit of theatre, a gimmick perhaps.  I use all of my performance skills in these transitional moments; I draw myself up to full height, exaggerate my gestures, and use my voice to effect: when the sound of the singing bowl faded away, my voice was a whisper. Later in the lesson, the children went and gathered items that they could use to make soft and loud sounds in the room and I conducted their found-sound-orchestra with the nearest pencil, using flourishes and facial expressions to indicate when I wanted each group to play. 

So many times when I watch teachers who are struggling to maintain students’ interest and to manage a group, I notice that, while the may have a good grasp of the content they’re teaching, they’ve forgotten (or have never thought about) that teaching is a performing art.  While I am absolutely an advocate of teacher as guide on the side and meddler in the middle, I am noticing that many teachers don’t know how to grab onto those ‘on stage’ moments and make the most of them. 

So, in the spirit of building dramatic tension please imagine a drumroll as I give you my top five tips for creating student engagement through performance.

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Posted by on in General

This-sucks.jpg

 

This sucks!!!

 

This is awesome!!!

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