• Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Archives
    Archives Contains a list of blog posts that were created previously.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in mental health

Posted by on in Social Emotional Learning

mental health 141

I hope everyone knows the above quote.  If not, you need to stop reading this and Netflix this movie!

I’ve done it, you’ve done it, and everyone you’ve worked with has done it.  At some point, you’ve taken a day off, but you didn’t use a vacation day, you weren’t sick, and you did things just for yourself with it. Shopped. Went out to eat. Got a massage or had a spa day. Watched a movie. Saw a baseball game. Binge-watched a series. Slept in. You get the idea. The phrase “mental-health day” has circulated in the workplace for years, yet many shy away from saying that’s what they’re taking.

NBC Nightly News recently aired a story about an employee who emailed her boss saying she was taking a mental-health day. Her boss replied supporting her.

While the summer is a great time to recharge and relax, we need to be doing this during the school year as well. We need to eat right, exercise, and partake in wellness. We all need mental-health days. Don’t shy away from it; be proud of it.

Last modified on
Hits: 620 Comments

Posted by on in General

I know it's hard...

Being a teacher is probably one of the most demanding jobs that exists in terms of the commitment, passion, and dedication that it requires. In some jobs, you put your time in, go home and relax, and forget about the challenges of the day, that customer that complained, that client who was unhappy, or possibly that project you're working on in the office.

Teaching is different. As a teacher, you invest so much in your students emotionally, financially, and professionally, that its hard to let go just because a bell rings at the end of the day. Whether its a student who told you about their troubled home life, didn't grasp a concept, or got embarrassedin front of their friends...those moments stick with you.

There is absolutely NOTHING that is going to change this aspect of our job. If you aren't invested in your students, you're probably doing it wrong.

However, if you are constantly focused on your job as an educator it can start to wear on you. It can even start to negatively impact your personal life, your relationships, and yes...as weird as it sounds...your performance as a teacher. Being too consumed by your job can actually hurt your ability to perform that job to the best of your ability.

If this sounds like you, don't worry! There are some things you can control to make it easier on yourself. Many teachers I talk with are always worried about planning, grading, that meeting they have the next day, or that observation they have coming up (which by the way you shouldn't stress out about...seriously)

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in Professional Development

music notes png by doloresdevelde d5gt351

For the new school year, why not try a little “day music” to get educators acquainted with themselves, colleagues, and students in a professional development session? My Contemplation Music Writing Project helped students find inner peace and I believe it will work with teachers.

But you might be wondering how I can make this leap from kids to adults? Can the project be adapted to expand intra- and interpersonal communication skills in educators’ worlds? How do we create a more tranquil individual and overall school environment? Can we deflate the stress effecting teachers today? Is it at all possible?

In a word, “yes.” My approach to EI/SEL is an alternative to the mindfulness programs used in schools. It was extremely successful with inner city students under very difficult circumstances. People use this simple technique in daily life without realizing it. And it all centers on music and music listening.

Picture this imaginary scene in professional development session:

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in Social Emotional Learning

I was driving home and was less than 15 minutes from my destination. I was excited to see my family and to also say good-bye to some family members that were in town. I was driving in the passing lane of a two-lane highway with a wide median, when I saw something that shook me to my core. I was crossing a bridge and saw a man laying on top of the safety railing, with half of his body dangling over the edge.

Immediately, my brain went into full overload. What was going on? Is he doing what I think he is doing? What should I do? In an instant, I decided to stop and help. I found the safest spot for me to turn around in the median and drove back around to meet up with the person. When I arrived on the scene, he was no longer laying on the railing of the bridge. He was now sitting on the curb of the overpass, no more than 5 feet away from the traffic flying past him. I then began to make my approach...

As I walked towards him, I yelled over, "Brother, what's going on?" He looked up at me and then quickly hung his head again. Once I was closer, I noticed there were fresh cuts and blood all over his arms, located dangerously close to the radial artery. I looked a little closer and saw that he had a hospital bracelet on his right wrist. These signs told me that this situation required specific interventions. Luckily for myself and this man, I have extensive training and experience in crisis-management and working with individuals dealing with issues.

I asked him what he was doing out here and he told me, very calmly, that he "wanted to die". I continued to slowly approach him and told him that I wanted to talk with him and asked him to follow me. His response to my plea was the same as before, "I want to die". At this point, I was several feet from where he was sitting with cars speeding by us. I knelt and asked him what he was feeling (the first question in my approach to understanding) and he told me that his wife didn't love him anymore. I told him that I cared about him and wanted to hear about everything, but that we were not safe where we were and I asked him to follow me. He agreed and we began a slow, cautious walk on the narrow highway shoulder off the bridge to the median.

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in Teens and Tweens

teens and tech

The innovative age of technology continues to inspire youth, both teenagers and children. This technology, however, may be causing serious health problems across young generations as well.

And teenagers are embracing technology more than any other age demographic. According to statistics portal Statista, smartphone users between the ages of 18 and 24 spend over 90 hours per month on apps. Some would even argue technology has become an addiction among teenagers and children.

It may even be shrinking the brains of youth. Astudy published in academic journal PLoS ONE (2011) found that Internet addiction might result in brain alterations and chronic mental dysfunction.

Could innovative devices such as smartphones, laptops, and tablets beharming the health of teenagers and children? From text neck to hearing loss, technology may not be so innovative after all. 

...
Last modified on