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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in preschool

Posted by on in Early Childhood

Last winter and Spring, I had the privilege of piloting my EQ program in a North Jersey preschool.  The pilot is a great success and we have begun our 2nd year.  Teachers love it, the children love being Creators of Joy (CJs). They could recite CJs 7 voices and how they made them feel, for ex. happy, good, kind.  I love visiting every two weeks and the picture you see is our Rainbow Rootie day when we all looked silly!  When I visit, I demonstrate the different aspects of the theme they are teaching for that week.  I learn as much as they do. The children love all of CJs buddies and continuously talk about them.

Research tells us that the emotional brain is growing the fastest from birth to six.  This certainly was evident for the younger children ( 3 year olds) were able to focus on CJ and how the voices felt more easily than the older children.  What a surprise!  They had less academics (left brain stimulation) and were more open to the messages and feelings and using CJ in their play.  So the earlier we start, the better!

b2ap3_thumbnail_Teaching-with-CJ-and-the-7-Attributes-of-Emotional-Intelligence_20171129-221445_1.jpg

The teachers asked for more time in their curriculum for CJ. This Fall they began this and are including more of the fun activities in the curriculum.  The activities all included history, science and inter-relational opportunities.  However, the trend in preschool is academics and yet the staff felt that they needed more time for these important skills. 

Research is showing us that children who have more play and social and emotional learning instead of the current trend in academics actually pull ahead by the time they reach 4th grade. Play teaches those important skills of sharing, compromise, critical thinking to name a few.

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Posted by on in Early Childhood

Ronan and Kerrigan 1024x682

How do you spell love? Literacy on little angel wings. Such joy, the most amazing learning experience of my life.

Here’s my update, year two preschool, teaching kiddos emergent skills of reading and writing, well, a lot more than that. Never sure who’s teaching whom. A day in the passionate life, so to speak. Since I wrote about the infamous PreKinder assessments, I'm into the sheer joy of teaching and learning from the kids, my best teachers. Life lessons, sometimes minute to minute. 

I walk into school, immediately surrounded by sticky fingers, hugs and checking out whether I have on my Minnie Mouse rainbow light-up watch. Loaded down with bags of mini-lessons, supplies, my lunch bag and layers, I barely make it to our little middle room to organize in about three minutes. Feel like the Pied Piper. "Good morning, Teacher Rita!"

I already told you I am really bad with crafts, so back out of the art room, big room so distracting, at home in the middle room, with all my favorite things, calendar, maps and globe, alphabet, flannel boards, our little table and chairs and loads of teaching sets, readers and books. In the corner is a huge beanbag with big stuffies and pillow. We read there a lot. And talk. And I listen.

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Posted by on in Early Childhood

child reading

Littles say the funniest things. The other day I asked “What’s your Mommy’s name?” Reply- Mommy.” Get what you ask for, right?

Childhood is a precious time. What’s the rush?

I’m back at school, year two, one week in, hired under a Literacy Grant, a good thing and not so good. What’s great is I have an opportunity to fine-tune teaching littlest learners, emergent readers. I was really winging it last year.

Students who returned are lots bigger, now the “biggers”, having moved up the ladder.

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Posted by on in Early Childhood

It’s right in your face, 24/7… terrorist attacks, shootings, disasters, accidents, and violence. This can be upsetting for adults, not to mention children.

Last week I couldn’t turn on any screen without seeing the eye-witness phone video of a state fair ride in a neighboring state, breaking apart and hurling riders to the ground. I remember gasping the first time I saw it, kind of surprised to see such graphic coverage on network television. But, as I thought about it more, I realized this was what we are all coming to expect from the news. Later that day, I met my neighbor and her daughter while walking my dogs. Little Megan was so excited to tell me she was going to the fair with Mommy and Daddy. She quickly added, “But we can’t ride on that one ride that broke and people got dead.” Her mother shared that unfortunately, Megan had also seen that video.

When I was growing up, most news coverage was in the newspaper and often a day old. There were grainy photos and copy I was yet unable to read. Television coverage consisted of some film and still photos taken by journalists. Today, everyone is a photojournalist, capturing news as it happens on their phones and there it is… in real time, on the big screen, in living color, and largely uncensored.

You could argue we are much better informed, but this has come at a cost to young children. They just don’t have the ability to comprehend news events in context. It becomes a barrage of disturbing images, voices, and information they can’t fully process. And, many times, parents aren’t around to help them process it at all.

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Posted by on in Early Childhood

swing set

On my way to work, I pass no fewer than 6 child care centers. As my life revolves around Early Childhood and young children, I am always interested in seeing what’s happening in programs in the community. It had been puzzling to me, no matter the weather or time of day, how few children I ever saw playing outside. In the winter, when it was approaching 40 degrees, after a fresh snow- no children. In the fall, it was sunny and windy and leaves were everywhere- nobody. In the spring, it had just rained, the sun was out, but all I saw were abandoned play areas.

It first, it was a curiosity, but as the seasons changed and the pattern persisted, I was concerned why there was this lack of outdoor, physical activity in child care.

I decided to do some unofficial investigating and started asking child care staff if they had some answers. Boy, did I get an earful!

The staffers very often cited children’s clothing as the problem. They said parents send their children in clothes not meant to get dirty or in shoes not safe for playground surfaces or equipment. It was also reported that parents, in their hurry to get out the door in the morning, forget jackets or hats or boots. A couple care providers even expressed their belief that some parents did these things on purpose, so their children would have to stay indoors.

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