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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in What Great Principals Do Differently
Posted by on in Education Leadership

2e1ax elegantwhite entry Bamradio Leadership That Moves

Have you ever heard someone say, "one day when I'm the leader" or "when I can make the decisions things will be different." They believe that the ability to influence decisions happens across a desk or podium. Many abdicate their influence by getting stuck believing that they can only truly influence other through a position. Your leadership doesn't begin when you get THE position. If you believe you will become a great leader once you get that instructional coach position, department chair, administrative job, or central office gig, you are missing the point. We grow the capacity of our leadership and influence by the choices we make today, not tomorrow. You become a great leader because of your relationship with people, not the position in relation to others. Your leadership role isn't about your job, it is about how you position yourself in the lives of people, your investment in them, not your actual position. Our capacity as leaders is best expressed when we understand that our position can support our effectiveness, but our effectiveness is never dependent on our position. We move others when we see that as our primary role, not to build our name but others. Allow me to share a few ways that our leadership can move others...

Connect

Every opportunity that gives you an opportunity to connect with someone you should take it. If as leaders we are inaccessible or set ourselves up that make us unrelatable then we greatly diminish our ability to be effective in other's lives. This doesn't mean I will be everyone's friend, but I certainly shouldn't attempt to make myself unlikable. There are those who would say, "I don't need to be liked but respected." Reality - people won't respect you if they don't like you. People won't follow you if they don't like you. People won't stay at your school if they don't like you. Let us not confuse fear with respect. If I stake my leadership based on what others are doing or not doing, results driven rather than relationships, it communicates a culture that values performance over people. In that type of system, people will never be able to perform enough.

Bottom line: Am I giving a compelling reason for people to stay connected and committed to our mission, school, district? 

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Posted by on in Leadership

sarcasm

In June 2014 I officially left my job as a fourth grade teacher, and the classroom, to become an administrator. Since joining the dark side, I continuously ask myself what I could have and should have done differently for my students.

While some of my previous work – such as this post on grading – has focused on how my teaching could have been enhanced, my biggest regret really has nothing to do with actual instruction.

My Regret

This quote by Todd Whitaker from What Great Principals Do Differently beautifully sums up the one change I wish I had made above all else:

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