• Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Archives
    Archives Contains a list of blog posts that were created previously.
  • Login
    Login Login form

They Aren't Interested in Anything.

Posted by on in Early Childhood
  • Font size: Larger Smaller
  • Hits: 934

Interesetd

The last several weeks and months have been busy ones as I've been getting used to my new job and figuring out how to manage all the competing priorities in my life.  How does she do it all? Well, I don't always do it all very well, so there's that!

It's been harder, in this new role, to tease apart the thematic threads of my work and to find things that are worth writing about.  It's not that they aren't there, it's just that every day is so different.  Just when an idea springs forward, another idea replaces it, in an endless loop of upstaging.  If I don't have time to write about it right away, poof... it's gone.  People ask me where I went in a week and I have to check my calendar to remind myself.  The whirlwind suits me but it isn't really conducive to thoughtful reflection.

But, as I looked back on my notes over March break, I noticed that one phrase has come up several times in my conversations with Kindergarten teachers.  We talk about their challenges working with an inquiry-based program, often for the first time, and they mention that they're frustrated because, it seems, the "kids aren't interested in anything." 

Now, I've taught a lot of kids over the years, I worked as a nanny and a camp counselor, and I have kids of my own.  I have yet to meet a kid who, literally, isn't interested in anything.

So, what does this really mean, this lack of interest?

Does it mean...

  • they aren't interested in anything that I'm interested in?
  • they aren't interested in anything that I already know about and feel confident teaching?
  • they aren't interested in anything that I can link easily to the curriculum?
  • they aren't interested in anything that looks academic?
  • they aren't interested in anything that resembles a theme?

It could be any one of those things or it could be something else entirely but more than anything, what I notice when I spend time in the classrooms where that frustration sits, is the lack of patient observation.  Several bloggers that I follow, Teacher Tom most notably, talk a lot about not doing.  He often mentions what he could, but doesn't, say or what he could, but didn't, do in his interactions with kids.  We get a glimpse into this alternative, teacher-led universe, and are then reminded how things turn out when the adults don't lead and choose to listen and watch instead.  

I think the biggest barrier to students expressing genuine interest is our adult desire to teach, to make it look like something is happening, to busy the room with activity, even when the child's pace is slower, more meandering, completely un-linear.  As I've learned all too well in the past few months, activity can be the enemy of observation and reflection.

I think we also sometimes suffer from a profound lack of imagination.  We wait for an interest that looks like school and, when it doesn't land at our feet, we get annoyed.  I have a 7 year old boy at home and, while he has many interests, he is very, very interested in poop.  He isn't the only one.  I came across this documentation in a small rural school I was visiting and I thought it was delightful, a great example of locality in pedagogical documentation.  I wonder, where would you go with this?  What questions would you ask next?  How would you develop this interest if this were your classroom?  Happy kid-watching and, as the snow melts, watch where you're walking!

Last modified on
Rate this blog entry:
Emily Caruso Parnell is the K-12 Arts Education Consultant in the Rainbow District School Board in Northern Ontario. Since beginning her teaching career in 2001, she has taught all grades from Kindergarten to Grade 12. She has taught in public, private, and independent schools, including teaching the IB Primary Years Programme and as the Arts-lead member of the local leadership team for Ontario's Early Learning Kindergarten Program. Emily is a Dance educator who holds an MA in Dance from the University of North Carolina Greensboro as well as a Bachelor of Education from the University of New Brunswick, an HBA from York University and is a Registered Teacher of the Royal Academy of Dance. Her writing is regularly featured in the PHE Canada Journal and she sits on the Program Advisory Committee for Dance Education of Physical and Health Education Canada. Emily is passionate about education in, about, and through the Arts as well as experiential learning, parent engagement, play, and as much time spent outdoors as possible. She strives to bring the same enthusiasm and energy to parenting her own young children.
  • No comments made yet. Be the first to submit a comment

Leave your comment

Guest Wednesday, 07 December 2016