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Why My Technology Presentation Stinks

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Education TECH

Recently, colleague Ross Cooper (RossCoops31) posted a piece on EduSurge that focused on why technology-infused tech sessions stink.  I’ll be the first to admit that one of my presentations which I do around the entire country is focused on tech in the classroom.  I call it “The Dirty 30,” and, not to brag, but it always has a packed house.  Like standing room only!  I remember that, at EdCampNJ two years ago, one of the organizers walked by my session, saw the overflow into the halls, and tried to look in.   

 It was also featured for the recent  NJASATechspo 2016 Conference in Atlantic City and even introduced by NJASA Technology Co-chair Dr. Scott Rocco.

Now, all that being said, it’s one of the reasons why I have been able to travel so much to different places in order to share with fellow superintendents, administrators, and teachers.  Ironically, it’s the one presentation I wish never to do again.  Why?  Because I am constantly shocked that fellow colleagues in my capacity and other administrators do not know about all of these.  How can you not?!?

I’m in a tough spot.  Of course, I’ll keep on doing and updating the presentation, but I’m always saddened to see  the reaction to some of the “oldies but goldies” apps that have been around for years.  In some instances, when I talk about Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, you would think I’m introducing a new line of computer programming.

I read Ross’s post twice and then sat down and looked at my presentation.  From now on, I plan on injecting the following as a part of my dialogue:

  • How to apply it in the school setting
  • The CCCS standards it could apply to
  • Assessment potentials
  • Any research tied to the style of learning that the app/extension provides

It is my hope that the next time I present, it’s not seen as some flash in the pan. And…I will warn people that I will be piling on the pedagogy in the process.

 

retwertetewrtewrtwertwert, colleague Ross Cooper (RossCoops31) posted a piece on EduSurge that focused on why technology-infused tech sessions stink.  I’ll be the first to admit that one of my presentations which I do around the entire country is focused on tech in the classroom.  I call it “The Dirty 30,” and, not to brag, but it always has a packed house.  Like standing room only!  I remember that, at EdCampNJ two years ago, one of the organizers walked by my session, saw the overflow into the halls, and tried to look in.  
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Jay Eitner is a proud product of the New Jersey public schools. A graduate from Union High School in 1997, Jay attended The American University in Washington DC with a BA in interdisciplinary studies. He began his teaching career in Roselle, NJ teaching a variety of subjects including social studies, computers, and digital literacy. Known for being ‘outside of the box’ and for strong technology infusion, Eitner strived to make a learning environment that was student centered, data driven, and technology infused. Jay received his Masters Degree from Kean University in 2004 and was hired to teach 8th grade social studies in the nationally recognized East Brunswick Public Schools. During his time in East Brunswick, Eitner has written & received over $140,000 in grants for his students. Grants ranged from podcasting equipment to creating a fully-interactive gold-rush experience, where students dug for gold during their westward expansion unit. Jay obtained his supervisor, principal, and school administrator certificates from the NJPSA NJ-EXCEL program in 2009. Administratively, Eitner has served as a middle school Assistant Principal in the Washington Township Schools , a K-12 Supervisor of Social Studies in the Hopewell Valley Regional School District, and a Superintendent of the Lower Alloways Creek School District. Jay currently serves as a Superintendent of Schools for the Waterford Township School District. He has presented a series of workshops on digital leadership, technology infusion, and student achievement. Recent awards include the 2015 national Educators Voice Award in the category of Superintendent, the White House MakerSpace distinction, and named to the national Academy of Arts & Sciences as a 2016 Educator To Watch.

Jay currently resides in Mount Laurel, New Jersey and is a proud Dad of twin girls and his puppy Lola.

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Guest Wednesday, 07 December 2016