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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in confidence

Posted by on in What If?

Probably one of the best predictors of a child’s success in life is strong self-confidence and self-esteem. They will set high goals for themselves and believe they can achieve anything they set their minds to. This is an outcome we all want for our children, but for some, it may not come so easy. High self-esteem is acquired and is not genetic. It is built a little at a time through their relationships with adults and other children. Life environments vary and support for self-worth and confidence does, too. Children living with trauma, for example, can be devoid of any support at all. A child who lacks confidence and a positive self-image may need an extra boost… or two or three. We can be intentional in providing support as we go through the day.

responsibilities

1. Give her some responsibilities and expect follow through. When a job is completed successfully, she will feel more confident and happy with herself. She will also have some good practice with her problem-solving skills. Our responsibility in all of this is to lavish encouragement and always praise her for doing such a good job.

2. Let her make her own decisions. Provide age-appropriate choices whenever possible. These can be simple- like choosing between putting away the dishes or the dolls at clean-up time. Allowing her to decide something for herself strengthens her confidence and sets the foundation for the times she’ll need to make more complex choices in the future.

3. Make sure the goals you set are realistic. Decide along with the child what the goals will be and ensure they are achievable. Confidence in herself will only be built if she can reach them.

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Posted by on in General

not-as-good2.jpg

Why would an educator make a statement like this?

Especially one who proclaims to be positive and has even written a post or two on the subject.

Because I am tired of beating myself up and watching others do the same. We are causing ourselves too much stress by basing our self-worth on best moments. And we are doing the same to our students. And we must stop!

Our goal should be to create highlight reels.

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Posted by on in Conferences

surfing

I’m writing from the glorious D-terminal in Hartsfield-Jackson airport. I was lucky enough to find a plug by my gate, so why not tap a vein for a bit.

Conference season for education professionals is upon us. Almost every week, there is a conference dedicated to educational pedagogy, technology, practice, or all aforementioned. Don’t be fooled, the first year of conferences is fun and exciting; going around the country, trying new foods, seeing new things. But after the second year, it gets old. Quick.

This will be my 5th year of crossing the country for various conferences. Some I look forward to, some I don’t. They are long, long days filled with meetings, workshops, salesman shoving things down your throat, and lots of food and beverages. I can’t even do the food and beverages anymore since my bypass surgery.

Don’t get me wrong; I’m very thankful and fortunate to do what I do, see what I see, and meet who I meet. However, many people don’t see the negatives of this; time away from home. Flying is still a royal pain, your hotel bed is not your bed, and seeing your kids via FaceTime is not the same as hugging your kids.

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Posted by on in Social Emotional Learning

b2ap3_thumbnail_Power--Weakness-Quote.png

I always say that you can find inspiration anywhere in this world, provided your ears, eyes, and heart are open. I had my brain sparked today while at church with my family. We go to church fairly regularly, even though I do not consider myself a Christian, as I identify most with the tenants of Buddhism. I could tune out what the Pastor says during the sermon, but I always make a concerted attempt at maintaining openness. This is a good thing because today he delivered absolute gold!

Today our Pastor talked about Kintsukuroi, the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with lacquer mixed or dusted with gold, silver, or platinum. The major philosophy of this practice is the breakage and subsequent repair are part of the history of the object instead of something to disguise (more info here). Typically when we repair an object, we want to hide the initial damage to make it look "good as new". Kintsukuroi places the emphasis on embracing and celebrating the damage because it is part of what makes the object unique and special. Go ahead and think about that for a second before reading any more!

So you've thought about this practice. Now I want you to think about how this practice can work if we apply it to ourselves, our students, and our schools. Is this how you approach your breaks and damage? Do our schools and students see it like this? Of course not! Society doesn't want us to focus on our previous cracks. We want to get past those issues as soon as we can and forget about them. Those are weaknesses and the quicker we forget about them, the better, right? WRONG!

Let's look at this from two different perspectives, the physical and emotional side of us.

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Posted by on in General

I-Slipped.jpg

It really shouldn’t be that big a deal, but it has been for the past three summers. And recently it has taken away too much of my positive energy. You see I am currently a vice principal, and for the past three summers this has been the time of year when I have been anxiously awaiting to hear if I will become a principal.

This year I did not even get an interview. It should not have bothered me so much because there weren’t even any openings in the counties to which I applied. And before you read any further you must know that this is not a “woe is me” tale. No, this is a short tale about opening one’s eyes, one’ ears and one’s heart to once again realize what is important in life and what is not.

It all started two weeks ago when I was called into the superintendent’s office for a  meeting with the Executive Team. When I got the call I thought to myself “this is it, you are finally going to be offered a principal position you’ve been so anxiously awaiting.”

Mind you, I hadn’t had an interview but I had been hearing rumors that I was going to get a position. Now I spend my days explaining to children that they mustn’t put any stock in rumors and yet here I was getting my hopes up. So when I sat down I was fully expecting to be receiving my coronation. But to my surprise no such ceremony occurred. Instead I was told that I was being laterally transferred to a different school. A great school! But at the time it didn’t matter to me because all I could think about was that I was not receiving a crown.

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Tagged in: confidence self doubt