60 Seconds with Gloria Ladson-Billings


Gloria Ladson-Billings is the author of the critically acclaimed books, The Dreamkeepers: Successful Teachers of African American Children, Crossing over to Canaan: The Journey of New Teachers in Diverse Classrooms, and Beyond the Big House: African American Educators on Teacher Education. She has won numerous scholarly awards, including the 2008 Distinguished Service Award from Teachers College.

60 Seconds with Peter DeWitt


Peter De Witt did his doctoral dissertation on the subject of safeguarding LGBT students at Sage College of Albany. His book Dignity for All: Safeguarding LGBT Students was published by Corwin Press in March of 2012. He is a consulting editor and visionary for the Connected Educator Series (Corwin Press. Fall 2014). Peter’s releases are Flipped Leadership Doesn’t Mean Reinventing the Wheel (Corwin Press, Connected Educator Series) and Climate Change: How Do I Foster a More Inclusive School Climate (ASCD. Fall 2014).

60 Seconds with Pasi Sahlberg


Pasi Sahlberg is Finnish educator, author and scholar. He has worked as schoolteacher, teacher educator, researcher and policy advisor in Finland and has studied education systems and reforms around the world. His expertise includes school improvement, international education issues, classroom teaching and learning, and school leadership. His best-seller book “Finnish Lessons 2.0: What can the world learn from educational change in Finland” won the 2013 Grawemeyer Award. He is a visiting Professor of Practice at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education in Cambridge, MA, USA. @pasi_sahlberg.

60 Seconds with Renee Hobbs


Renee Hobbs received an Ed.D in Human Development from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, an M.A. in Communication from the University of Michigan, and a B.A. with a double major in English Literature and Film/Video Studies from the University of Michigan.

60 Seconds with Carol S. Dweck


Carol S. Dweck is the Lewis and Virginia Eaton Professor of Psychology at Stanford University. She graduated from Barnard College in 1967 and earned a Ph.D. from Yale University in 1972. She taught at Columbia University, Harvard University, and the University of Illinois before joining the Stanford faculty in 2004. Her research looks at the origins of these self-conceptions, their role in motivation and self-regulation, and their impact on achievement and interpersonal processes..