• Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Archives
    Archives Contains a list of blog posts that were created previously.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Tony Kline, Ph.D. | @TonyKlinePhD

Tony Kline, Ph.D. | @TonyKlinePhD

As a professor of education, Tony Kline, Ph.D. is always learning. Having taught in rural villages in Africa to urban neighborhoods in the midwest, he has been surrounded by individuals who've dedicated their lives to impacting students. Now as a professor of education who has taught on four continents, he's had the great pleasure to work with colleagues to help prepare over 1,000 current teachers who are passionately serving in today's classrooms. Tony Kline, Ph.D. is an assistant professor for the Franks School of Education at Trine University in Angola, Indiana. He has been honored by Phi Delta Kappa International as an Emerging Leader Under 40 and was the recipient of the Excellence in Teaching Award by Ball State University and Trine University. These thoughts and views are personal and do not represent any outside organization.

Posted by on in What If?

stencil.twitter post 66

SIMPLE TRUTH:

The power of a teacher is truly known when we allow a child to be truly known

 

RESEARCH TELLS US:

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in What If?

INtroveerted

"She just needs to talk more in class."

Those were the words a frustrated mother shared with me during one of my first parent-teacher conferences.  The mother's goal was for her child to speak up more in class.  That was it.  In her mother's opinion, that's all the daughter needed to be more successful in school; she just needed to break out of her shell.  I thought to myself, "Well, that seems easy enough."

Oh, my naivety.

As an inexperienced teacher (and strong extrovert myself), it seemed logical to not question the validity of this parent's request.  At that time, I equated students who actively spoke in class as the bright and engaged learners.  If I'm honest, and if you follow the logic of that belief system, then I probably considered those students who spoke up less in class as less enthusiastic and engaged learners.

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in What If?

 GROWTH

SIMPLE TRUTH:

The behaviors teachers model speak louder to students than any words teachers use. 

RESEARCH TELLS US:

Carol Dweck, a psychology professor at Stanford University, made a splash in the education world with her recent book, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success.  She asserted that "students' mindsets, how they perceive their abilities, played a key role in their motivation and achievement, and we found that if we changed students' mindsets, we could boost their achievement. More precisely, students who believed their intelligence could be developed (a growth mindset) outperformed those who believed their intelligence was fixed (a fixed mindset)."

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in What If?

Checklist

Simple Truth: We don't learn from our experiences. We learn from reflecting upon our experiences.  

Wow, where did the week go?

Inside the world of education, teachers know this feeling all too well.  Our responsibilities to our students, colleagues, leadership, and stakeholders are intense and ongoing.  It's due to these responsibilities and the fast-moving nature of our profession that often leave educators wondering where the time went at week's end.

CheckslitAnd too often our "where did the week go" questions can suddenly shift to "where did this month" or even "where did this year go."  At what cost does the hectic flurry of the education year impact our school's climate?  How often do we overlook potential opportunities to support and encourage our students and peers because of this pace?  And over time, what negative impact does this have on the climate of our school? 

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in School Culture

Simple Truth: Our conscious (and subconscious) biases can have a real impact on our students.

 

It went on for weeks.

During my pre-dawn drives to the gym, I would routinely pass a middle-aged man alongside the road. He wore the same clothes and was usually digging through trash or trying to hitch a ride. Day by day I drove past him, often wondering about his story. Who was he? What experiences led him to this point?

And most importantly, what could I do to help him?

...
Last modified on