EDWORDS: Latest Blog Posts

  • Share! What Does It Really Mean?

    Adults interrupt young children in a fraught struggle over a toy, by ordering “share”. The child drops the toy in tears and frustration, having learned that if you have something, you have to “share”? (AKA give up) Jacky Howell had an example in one of her trainings: Walking up to a woman, she looked into the other woman’s purse, saw her wallet, and said, “Share!”. It brought forth paroxysms of laughter among early childhood educators, not to mention parents. Point taken! When a very youn ...

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    by Gail Multop @gailmult
    Friday, 21 June 2019
  • Risky Play for Young Children? Apparently There's More Risk Without It!

    Without a doubt, the photo at the beginning of this post would probably evoke a clenched-teeth, inward sucking of air by many parents. Risky play always does. But, in all fairness, it needs to be discussed, examined, and justified. This is especially important since it can help develop a child’s self-confidence, resilience, executive functioning, and even risk-management skills. And, believe it or not, engaging in risky play can actually reduce the risk of injuries, rather than increase it. Chi ...

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    by Debra Pierce | @easycda
    Friday, 14 June 2019
  • Should Teachers Wear Jeans?

    Moving Day, Saturday June 8, 2019. Boxes and Teachers wearing Jeans, what a combo.  Let me say this, about that. Should Teachers wear jeans every day? Hmmm. Hot topic. Never thought much about it. I never knew this is such a big topic for teachers. I read a great We Are Teachers article by Kristy Louden on June 6, 2019, posted by 'We Are Teachers' on Twitter. "Teachers Should Be Allowed to Wear Jeans Every Day & Here's Why". I thought it was an interesting read, so I shared it. ...

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    by Rita Wirtz | @RitaWirtz
    Sunday, 09 June 2019
  • Ready for Preschool? Ready, Set, Yes or No?

      A rainy Saturday afternoon in Eugene, Memorial Day weekend 2019. Family reflection.  If you are a preschool, kindergarten teacher, aide, parent, grandparent, everybody, this blog is for you!  Never did I think I would round out my teaching career in preschool, but I did. The kids taught me so much, a world of hand washing, bandaids, bugs, snails, glitter and a lot of books. Childhood is a precious time, what's the rush? What if we had some barometers of what a ready kiddo mi ...

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    by Rita Wirtz | @RitaWirtz
    Saturday, 25 May 2019
  • Empty Classroom

    The final day of another school year has quickly come and gone, and summer vacation is but a few hours old.  The desks have been cleaned and stacked.  The books have been packed away in cupboards.  Student work has been taken down and handed back to kids to either take home or add to the recycling bin already bulging outside our classroom door. And the kids have all left the building in search of many exciting adventures far removed from school. This final day of school lasted j ...

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    by Tim Ramsey | @PlutoTim
    Saturday, 25 May 2019
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Avoiding Bumps Along the Way by Debra Pierce

The Verification Visit with the PD Specialist has a specific structure. You must bring your Professional Portfolio and the Competency Standards book to the Verification Visit. The pages in the back of the book will be used during for the Observation, the Review of the documentation, and the Reflective Dialogue.

The PD Specialist will look over your documentation, verifying the CDA training and the contents of the Profession Portfolio. The PD Specialist will be using p. 20 of the Comprehensive Scoring Instrument (at the back of the Competency Standards book) to record evidence from the Professional Portfolio. This would include verifying your CDA training, the number of Family Questionnaires collected, the Resource Collection, the six Competency Statements, and the professional Philosophy Statement.

There are two parts of your documentation that are extremely important and if they are incomplete, inaccurate, or missing, your CDA will be put on hold until it is corrected.

These two include:

1. The CDA training hours. If there are not enough hours accounted for (and the candidate has not    received a waiver) or the training is not from an   accepted source (See the section in the Competency Standards book that describes “Acceptable Professional Education”).

2. The first aid/CPR certification. This certification must be the type the Council requires (infant/child “pediatric” CPR) and it must not be expired.

The PD Specialist will wait until the end of your Verification Visit to tell you if either of these two problems exist and explain that the Council will be sending a postcard with the required procedures in order to continue your CDA process. This must be completed within 6 months of the date you received the “Ready to Schedule” notice. If not, your CDA will be forfeited.

Are There Any Other Issues That Can Put the Brakes On My CDA?

Yes, there are. One of them can happen early on in the process. If you are working in a child care program, you will need to decide on a CDA setting endorsement. This would be either infant/toddler or preschool. You will indicate this choice when ordering your Competency Standards book from the Council for Professional Recognition.

That book will be tailored to earning a CDA for that specific endorsement, including your Resource Collection, your Competency Statements, your Professional Philosophy Statement, the Observation, and Verification Visit.

Be sure to let the center-director know you have made this choice. It is critical that your classroom placement and the endorsement you choose match and stay the same until after your Observation and Verification Visit.

If your classroom is changed, you may not have the same age group as before, which would mean the materials ordered from the Council would not be valid for this new classroom. You would need to purchase another Competency Standards book for your current setting and classroom.

If you are a “floater” in your child care program, you will need to be proactive, as well. Moving around from one classroom and age group to another will simply not work when earning a CDA.

Furthermore, you and the children in that room need to get to know each other well and you need to be very familiar with the routines and environment, so you can act as lead teacher on the day of your Observation. The parents of the children must know you well enough to complete the Family Questionnaires.

Tell your director that if she wants you to earn your CDA, she will have to support you with this. If you aren’t getting the cooperation of the management in maintaining a particular setting through your CDA process, you may need to find another place to work that will.

As you work on your CDA, remember there is     support and help. Getting started is often the hardest part… just knowing where to begin. Staying         organized is the key and having some step-by-step help doesn’t hurt, either! Check out the new CDA Prep Workbook and pre-assembled binders on my website.

Your stress will be gone in no time. I promise!

Visit my website at easycda.com