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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in academic optimism

Posted by on in Classroom Management

girl meditating hologram1

Today, more than ever, our students are experiencing significant amounts of stress at school and home. Whether it is extracurricular activities, classwork, after school jobs, family life, or peer interactions, our boys and girls are loaded down with responsibilities and stress. Sometimes, it’s difficult for kids and teens to dissipate stress which can obviously interfere with their learning and wellbeing in and out of the classroom. Even on those days where it seems impossible to squeeze in one more obligation or standard into our lessons, it’s imperative we teach students stress relievers to help them function and find joy in learning. No matter what level you teach, all students need to find effective ways to manage stress. 

Please scroll through the following list of top school stress relievers for students that are relatively simple, appropriate, and adaptable to any grade level: 

Get Moving.  

A healthy way for students to beat stress is to get plenty of exercise. In our classrooms, we can adjust our schedules to include regular movement. This can be as simple as doing stretches and yoga in opening, scheduling enough recess time, taking “brain breaks” with action songs or stretches, implementing a “walking club” before school, or asking administration to build sufficient physical education into daily schedules. In addition, we can encourage students to walk or ride their bikes to school.

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Tagged in: academic optimism

Posted by on in Education Leadership

Happy New Year! It's such a pleasure to share this beautiful story as we kick off 2018. I think we all need to grab tissue, then go buy some neckties! 

 

"Something somewhat extraordinary happened last month at Billy Earl Dade Middle School in Dallas.

The school — with a student population of nearly 900, about 90 percent from low-income families — planned to host its first “Breakfast with Dads,” according to the Dallas Morning News. About 150 male students, ages 11 to 13, signed up. But event organizers were concerned that some would attend without a male figure at their side, so they put out a call for volunteers who could serve as mentors.

“When a young person sees someone other than their teacher take interest in them, it inspires them. That’s what we want to see happen,” the Rev. Donald Parish Jr., pastor of True Lee Missionary Baptist Church and the event organizer, told the Morning News.

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Posted by on in Early Childhood

Tonight I am writing about Hope. Every Child a Star! Leo The Early Bloomer.

One of my favorite children's books, Leo the Late Bloomer, resonates for us all. Regardless of who we are teaching, there are lessons galore in this special book written by Kraus, illustrated by Aruego in 1971.

Maybe even more relevant today, as we push children to exceed, meet sometimes unreasonable standards and expectations, at least as measured by standardized testing. My opinion, as a believer in DAP, developmentally appropriate instruction. 

Poor Leo. He couldn't do anything right, couldn't read, write, draw, was a sloppy eater and never said a word. His father, in particular watched him for signs of blooming but pretty much gave up. In our class, many of the children have no daddies, only tired working mothers who trust our teachers to provide a seamless sense of family from home to school. Parents are our partners. 

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Posted by on in Education Leadership

education conference

With the school year going into full swing, so are many of the weekend September festivities; festivals, football, and fall TV. For educators, it is also a time for weekend conferences, workshops, and edcamps.

Ever since becoming a Superintendent, I have been faced with the same questions at least once a week; below is a simple Q & A for you.

"Why do  you still participate in EdCamps, conferences, and weekend workshops?" 

Simple answer: because I enjoy them. I enjoy learning at these workshops. I enjoy learning from others and with other.  I enjoy networking.  Most importantly, I enjoy seeing how other students are learning and how I can harness their triumphs for my students and teachers.

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Posted by on in General

newschool

Moved to the Big Leagues, a brand new school, truly a land of enchantment. Transition complete. We made it! What a journey. Here's my story for today, a special day. Posting on 9/11 provides a tremendous reponsibility to focus on hope, life and family. History cannot be changed, but life matters and schools are families, first.

Memories and remembrances. What and who we are, as a nation. Moving forward, defying the greatest obstacles.

Yesterday we took the last summer field trip To Enchanted Forest, a storybook land hidden amidst beautiful canopies of Oregon trees. Favorite fairy tales came to life around every bend. It was fitting to celebrate the end of week school success as a family. Families always come first in iife.

I've written a number of posts recently and totally lost the last published blog entirely, which is probably a good thing. I managed to call forth and share my tale of being 'trapped' in my kids' home due to nature's naughtiness, and finding an inherent lesson. I hoped there would be a lesson in humanity and humiity, and I believe there was. All, in all. And a lot about Family. So here I go, starting over, but the updates are sweeter than sweet.

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