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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in education leadership

Posted by on in Education Leadership

 

Are you kidding me? Hard to believe. We saw the photos of the polar vortex. Brrrr.

Gorgeous ice formations, but feh! The havoc wreaked, maybe not over yet. Time will tell what Mother Nature has in store with her fickle surprises lately.

Looked like a disaster movie, maybe the one with Dennis Quaid, Day After Tomorrow, where the kids ended up burning books in the library to stay warm. But they were saved in the end. Happy ending, reunion. I like happy endings. I'm not so sure this story about the hockey game has a happy ending. Let me know what you think about the whole fiasco. Oops, meant to, well, sort of, hold back my opinion. Here goes.

Oh boy, call me crazy! And the best part of this story is, well not gonna' tell you. Just a quick read here to find out!

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Posted by on in Education Leadership

How do you normally feel after attending an all day conference or summit? Exhausted both mentally and physically? Sluggish? Overwhelmed? Funny thing happened to myself and two of my colleagues after attending a recent all day summit at Google in Pittsburgh called "Be Internet Awesome." We weren't exhausted mentally or physically. We weren't sluggish. And we weren't overwhelmed. In fact, it was the quite the opposite. We felt refreshed, energized, and full of thought and discussion. 

So how did Google do this? How did they create an all day summit that was just right and left the attendees leaving refreshed, energized, full of thought and discussion? I have been wondering this since the summit and how to take Google's format back to future faculty meetings, in-services, and other conferences/summits. 

Here are my thoughts about how the Google Summit on Digital Safety & Citizenship left those in attendance feeling anything but exhausted:

Comfort

Right from the start, our hosts were concerned with our comfort. This sent a clear message right away that they cared about us. Our Google hosts also invited us to get up and move around any time we needed to. We were told we could sit in back on couches or on floor against wall if we wanted. The choice was ours. Food was in the back we were welcome to any time we wanted, as well. In addition to food, they had music playing in the background that provided an upbeat feel. Finally, everyone, including our Google hosts were dressed comfortably. 

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Posted by on in Leadership

hero woman red cape blue sky

A teacherpreneur? What's that?

Ok...this is actually a term that has been growing over the past few years, so you may have heard of it. If you haven't, a "teacherpreneur" is an educator who uses their talents and business savvy to share their work, passion, and philosophy with others. (You can read more about them here)

This could be something as simple as becoming an educational blogger, consulting, speaking at conferences, writing a book or even creating a website (like this one!). This can also include taking on more leadership in your own district. I've been a teacherpreneur full-time for a few years now, and there are some amazing benefits that I want to share. 

1. It Increases Your Impact.

As a teacher myself, something I always hated was the limit that a single classroom had on what I was doing. I'm not trying to downplay the impact you can have as a teacher on 30 or 100 kids a year (depending on your grade level), BUT...no matter how good you are as an educator, you are limited by the number of kids in your seats.

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Posted by on in What If?

My first “official” day on the job was July 5, and before I could get started, I needed a work space.  I had taken a few tours of the facilities before, and I saw that my new office was on the third floor–the top corner office with a great view.  It was more like a penthouse.

And then I checked out the whole building and told the movers to put all of my belongings in the basement. You read correctly.  The basement!  My staff began to panic and wanted to know if I was okay.

I picked an office that is the size of a utility closet at best. No windows. No bathroom. No opulence resembling the typical superintendent ‘s office. Just enough room to hang a few pictures and my academic credentials.

Why would I do something like this? A few reasons…

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Posted by on in General

pool

I nearly drowned as a second grader! A couple of the other kids had their arms around our coach as she walked closer to the deep end of the pool. I followed closely behind her. But before I knew it, I could no longer bob up and down and touch the bottom of the pool with my toes. I panicked and tried desperately to keep my head above water. At the moment before I knew my life was about to end, I looked up into the stands and saw my mom motioning to me to put my head down and swim. “Swim, Sandy!” she yelled. I looked to the side of the pool, and my coach was doing the same thing. No one was running to save me! “Swim, Sandy!” their blended voices hollered. It wasn’t the most graceful American crawl, I’m sure. But, I did make it to the side of the pool and am still alive to tell the story. 

I’ve often thought about this experience when I’ve faced changes and challenges throughout my career. When I start to feel a little overwhelmed or some self-doubt, I hear the voices in my head saying, “Swim, Sandy!” I know then that I need to FOCUS and swim! It isn’t always pretty getting to the side for a breather, but I make it. My coaches don’t jump in and rescue me, but I know they’re on the side cheering me on because they believe that I’ll be successful. As a result, I have a stronger sense of self-efficacy. There is a need for some basic knowledge, but the application of what I’ve learned is up to me. 

“Jumping into the deep end of the pool” can be a little scary, but it’s also where we’ll experience the most growth. Being in the deep end of the pool forces us to leave our comfort zones and apply our new learning. While many educators heed the advice of starting small when it comes to change, I’ve always jumped in and have swum for my life. It's even been a joke that I'll figure things out as I'm doggy paddling. I’ve grown very comfortable with being uncomfortable. Making mistakes and learning from those mistakes is part of who I am. It’s part of my creative spirit. Although I can envision where I need to go and want to be, I don’t always know the “how-to’s, ” and that’s where there’s risk-taking. It’s often through play, experimentation, and collaborating with others that the best ideas come about and benefit kids.

Regardless of whether educators jump in the deep end of the pool or start at the shallow end, the point is to move forward and start making the changes that our kids deserve. It seems that our profession is the only one where those who remain stagnant are allowed to keep their jobs. We would never go to a doctor or dentist who was not current with the most updated medical practices. We would never board a plane of an untrained pilot and seek advice from a lawyer who did not know the current laws. Businesses that don't continually change and adapt go out of business. Yet, educators who have children's lives on the line, continue to hold onto old mindsets and traditions. 

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