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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Higher Ed

Posted by on in Teaching Strategies

During World Creativity & Innovation Week (April 15-21, 2018) I had the pleasure of moderating a week-long conversation on imagination with the Google+ Creative Higher Education (#CreativeHE) community. My imaginative colleague Jailson Lima from Vanier College, Quebec, moderated with me. You can read the whole week of conversation on Google+ in the Creative Academic community space here.

Walking Challenge

We posed an imaginative challenge on Day 3. The challenge? Get Outside. Here's what we said:

Greetings imaginative colleagues! Sometimes we need to change our contexts (eg actual locations, ways of engaging, practicing or thinking) to get our imaginations going; we need to purposefully step outside of our typical practices to more easily envision new possibilities and alternative perspectives. The goal of this challenge is to stimulate the imagination of someone else and the challenge requires you to literally (and figuratively) get outside. We want you to take a walk with wonder and curiosity guiding you. Have something in mind that you teach or you might help someone else learn. Let your wonder and curiosity guide you in noticing what your local community might teach. What lessons or knowledge does the Place afford? How is your imagination ignited? If you are a teacher or educational developer seek the affordances for teaching/learning this topic outside. What imaginative task or activity might your students do while outside (walking or in stillness) that could enhance their imaginative engagement and meaning-making and enable their creativity to flourish?

(You can learn more about the Walking Curriculum from imaginED hereCurrently a PreK-12 resource but expanding!)

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Posted by on in Inquiry-Based Learning

WHAT WHY HOW

I read a post the other day from Ross Cooper titled Inquiry is king. Here's why...  In any progressive vision for learning where students exercise agency, inquiry is a non-negotiable, and this needs to be the direction where we are headed for our schools and classrooms. I do wonder, though, how we as educators are practicing and modeling inquiry. Is inquiry a critical part of the professional learning cultures within our schools and districts? We have to be masters of the inquiry process if it is to become the norm in our classrooms. From my experiences, there is one thing we can do as educators that will fuel our shift to inquiry in the classroom:

Educators must become skilled at problematizing their practice. Change begins with a good question about practice.

When we problematize our practice, we engage in real-world problem solving. we hone our personal skills of inquiry and we model the struggles, challenges and rewards of inquiry for each other and our students.

Teaching Inquiry to Educators

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Posted by on in Education Resources

shareasimage 17

The end of the semester has come. As I grade through the seemingly never-ending pile of papers, I reflect. How did the students respond to the textbook and certain activities this semester? How engaged did they seem during class? I consider the success level on student assignments and how that success was determined. Should I modify the assignment? The rubric? Do I allow for students to “show what they know” in a variety of ways, depending on their personal preferences and learning styles? Although the semester is over for students, my learning continues.

stacksIn fact, I learn quite a bit each semester. Did that new approach produce the desired results? Was that structure a headache or worth it? Were there student needs I was unprepared for? How can I better set each student up for success, while still allowing them to meet high standards?

One of my favorite reflection tools at the end of the semester is the exit ticket. Each student completes one, whether in a face-to-face or online course, before they leave the course. It’s their final task. The exit ticket provides me with student insight for the course but also assists me in learning more about each student. Although I modify it slightly every semester, here’s what the exit ticket entails:

When answering the following, reflect on the entire course.

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