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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Learning

Posted by on in General

kid not listening

There is something seriously wrong with the ability for our children to retain information.  The decline has been swift and severe in just the past decade.

Perhaps they are not listening.  Perhaps they don’t see any reason for listening…or remembering.  Perhaps they are surrounded by distractions – peers, technology, drama.  Perhaps there is something in their diet that is bringing about an organic change in their brains.

Perhaps it is just not cool to think any longer.

I have been teaching a great deal of history in my writing class in order to bring forth some thoughtful essays.  In December, we discussed and wrote about the bombing of Pearl Harbor.  After the holidays, we studied the Japanese internment camps.  This past week we began learning about the bombing of Hiroshima. 

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Tagged in: knowledge Learning

Posted by on in Education Resources
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Success is less about what you know now and more about how quickly and effectively you can learn and use new information.
This is the most important thing I learned in my 15 years or teaching and mentoring teens.
Success depends on skills. Build up a skill set and help others do the same and you will succeed.
There are over 20,000 high schools in the US and most of them focus on test scores and teaching specific subjects not success skills.
Schools were designed in the Industrial Era to pacify kids and produce citizens who follow society's rules and conventions, work guidelines, and their manager's directions.
This is perfect for working retail or on an assembly line.
The problem is that many present jobs call for creative problem solving - the type that does not follow specific formulas or directions but requires original ideas.
This requires learning and applying information on the go. To be useful, such real time learning must be efficient and effective - the information must be understood quickly and applied almost immediately.
The life success test does not involve filling out bubbles and answering multiple choice questions. It calls for providing the most affordable and advantageous solution to a problem a person or a group of people faces.
Again, this requires application of skills not being capable of winning on Jeopardy. ("Learning How to Learn for $200 Alex.")
The most important success skill anyone can use is being able to learn and apply new information quickly.
This is of course extremely useful in school because it can help a teen earn better grades. But it goes beyond that...
Being able to quickly absorb, understand, retain, and use new information in the age in which information grows exponentially is anyone's key to success.
I lay out the path to achieving this in a series of short lessons in my new book Crush School Student Guide: Learn Faster, Study Smarter, Remember More, and Make School Easier.
The critics say:
"If you are a kid, get this book. Use it. Learn it. Apply it. Grow because of it. Invest in yourself. You deserve it."
"Oskar writes in a conversational and easy to understand tone."
"Through activities the students will discover how their brain learns, how it impacts their learning style, and finally, how she or he can apply that knowledge to learn 'smarter not harder'."
The book is now on sale for $19.95 (33% OFF the regular price of $29.95) until Thursday, August 30th. You can grab it at http://bit.ly/crushschoolguide
 
You have the power to change lives. Use it often so they can change the world.

 

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Posted by on in Teaching Strategies

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When You Teach Something You Get To Learn It Twice - Jim Kwik

Cameron, a former student of mine, who is now in college, commented on my recent post about efficient and effective learning titled Too Much What, Not Enough How. Here's what he wrote on Facebook:

As a student who graduated with a GPA well above 4.0, I completely agree specifically with the point about students teaching subject-matter. Most of what made me successful was not studying - I rarely did that - but teaching other students, and in doing so, closing gaps in and solidifying what I knew. I tutored other students in almost every single class I took throughout my high school career, especially the science courses. That was my secret to success and I didn't even realize it until senior year. The feeling you get when you help someone grasp an idea they struggled with is an awesome feeling, too.

But Why Is Teaching Such An Effective Learning Strategy?

If you closely analyze and dissect Cameron's comment you can identify at least 4 aspects that made his strategy of teaching others to learn it yourself super effective. They are Active Learning, Deeper Learning, Efficient Learning, and Emotional Learning. 

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Posted by on in Teaching Strategies

Learning is like playing the blues.

If you wanna get really good at it and be able to improvise, you must practice playing the blues a lot. You must also understand it. The scales, the chord progressions, the beats, the turnaround, the stories, the mood; the "how to blues."

If you wanna get really good at learning you must practice learning. You must also understand it. The brain, the habits, the strategies, what works, what doesn't; "the how to learn."

If you understand how your brain learns you might be able to hack your learning; to improvise and modify sketchy study strategies that mostly don't work and make them more effective.

Today, I attempt to do that with cramming and if you read my last post What's The Brain Deal With Cramming? you know that I don't recommend it and instead advocate for smart spaced practice. 

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Posted by on in General

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Tripping on 'shrooms in Prague once I stopped by an art gallery window and saw it. It was an orange dog; the tiniest of canines. A stain of fluorescent orange paint in the bottom right corner of a sizable painting of some natural scenery. I remember the grass, the trees, and the people in it but in that moment all I could focus on was the strange orange dog.

I was 23, window shopping, and laughing too hard at a silly little orange dog on an otherwise green painting. Later, I was examining people's faces on the metro ride back to the Airbnb-style room I booked. Being aware I'm influenced I felt I could look into anyone's soul and know who they were. It was like a superpower that allowed me to see them for who they really were; if they were good or bad.

And in case the good people in my school district's HR department are reading this occurred 17 years ago, happened before I became a teacher, and was the last time I used psychedelics. It's just that I still remember that dang dog and wonder if my memory would be so vivid had my consciousness not been altered. For some reason, my mind decided it was significant enough to keep and maybe it uses it somehow to this day without me even realizing.

Using More Of The Brain

Steve Jobs, Richard Feynman, Jimi Hendrix, Jean-Paul Sartre, Bill Gates, John Coltrane, and The Beatles have 2 things in-common; they changed the world by being the GOATs (greatest of all time) of their respective crafts and they operated outside of the realm of conditioned and compliant thinking. Oh, and they all used psychedelics, so that would make it three things I suppose.

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