• Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Archives
    Archives Contains a list of blog posts that were created previously.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in positive classroom environment

Posted by on in Professional Development

people woman coffee meeting

Once the school year starts, there's hardly a moment to breathe. The pace of school life, particularly at the early-childhood and elementary levels, is marked by significant time-on-task with large numbers of children and tremendous responsibility for coaching, leading, and responding to students', families', and system-wide needs, expectations, questions, and requirements.

Summer gives you the time to strategize for the year ahead, and as you strategize, it's good to think about the new and existing initiatives, opportunities, and expectations that exist. In the best of circumstances, I think it serves educators well to stay ahead of these new efforts and endeavors so that you don't have to back track, do it over, or repeat work. Plus, to plan with the future in mind means that you're ready for this new work.

To break down this strategizing, I recommend the following actions:

Read and Watch System-Wide News

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in Teaching Strategies

It is important for teachers to make it easy for their students to work well together—an undertaking requiring diplomacy as well as dedicated effort. Social inclusion is such a vital aspect of any student’s life that the effort often results in beneficial dividends. What are some of the most common barriers to social acceptance in school? Many students could feel excluded because they do not know their classmates. It is a mistake to assume that students know each other well. Even students who have attended school together for several years may not know much about their classmates.

Another barrier is that your students may live in different neighborhoods. If you teach in a school where students may live at a distance or come from very diverse neighborhoods, it is likely that they have not had many opportunities to interact with each other outside of school.

In addition, students who have not been taught how to behave courteously or who have not learned socially acceptable ways to resolve conflict often struggle to form appropriate relationships with their peers.

Perhaps the greatest barrier that you will have to help your students overcome is the perception that they may not have much in common with a classmate whom they do not know well. With effort and persistence, you can assist students in learning to recognize their commonalities so that they can learn to accept and support each other. Use the tips in the list that follows to guide you as you work to help students remove the barriers to peer acceptance.

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in General

glass-of-water.jpg

All I wanted was to finish my last bit of dinner in peace. Resting my head in my hands wasn't really easing the pain but it wasn't making it any worse. As my head continued to throb, I alternated between food and water. My family knew my head was killing me and they gave me the space and quiet that I needed.

A few more bites and I would make my way upstairs. The stillness of the room was saving me from this migraine that came out of nowhere. It was one of those headaches where just the slightest noise or the faintest light is painful.

Then out of nowhere, I saw my five year old son coming towards me. He had noticed that the water in my glass was getting low and he didn't want me to run out.

Watching him wield the water filter so as to top off my glass was a sight to behold. He had to garner all his strength and summon every bit of his coordination to transfer the water from the filter to my glass. But he did it quite well. And it warmed my heart.

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in Classroom Management

b2ap3_thumbnail_Screen-Shot-2016-06-16-at-12.05.44-PM.png

My daughter Annie did not get up and get ready for school with me today.  Yesterday was her last day at Amity Middle School and today she is sleeping in.  This year Annie talked about school non-stop.  Every time I got into the car with her I would hear about Mr. Goldstein's experiments, we now have a Sons of Liberty flag flying at our house after completing research for a social studies project, and the kid no longer believes that mathematics was created to simply destroy souls of children.

A couple days ago I received a letter from a graduating senior thanking me for 8th grade.  In the letter he mentioned many things, but not a single time did he mention any content or skills directly.

"...you were so encouraging..."

"...thank you for believing in me when I did not."

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in What If?

stencil.twitter post 75

At its most fundamental level, a classroom community will be defined by the commonalities that students share, the presence of courteous behavior, and appropriate ways to solve conflicts. These positive relationships all pave the way for a united classroom where students can thrive instead of simmer in various types of disruptive conflicts.

When students can focus on what they have in common, many of the barriers to acceptance and tolerance will disappear. With effort and persistence, you can assist students in learning to recognize their commonalities. Use the tips in the list below to guide you as you work to help students learn to see what they have in common rather focus on the things that divide them.

Make sure that each student’s strengths are well-known to the rest of the class.

If a student has an unpleasant history of failure or misbehavior, make it clear that it is time for a fresh start.

...
Last modified on